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Drinking coffee can cut dementia risk among women

Women who drink 2-3 cups of coffee a day could reduce their risk of developing dementia by more than a third, say researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the United States 

Women who drink 2-3 cups of coffee a day could reduce their risk of developing dementia by more than a third, say researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the United States.

During a 10-year study, researchers followed 6,467 women over the age of 65 who consumed an average of 261mg of caffeine per day.


Research shows caffeine-drinkers are less likely to develop dementia. Picture: IStock

This is equivalent to 2-3 8oz cups of coffee, 5-6 8oz cups of tea, or 7-8 12-ounce cans of cola. 

During the study period, 388 of the women developed cognitive impairment or dementia.

Fact

850,000 people in the UK have a form of dementia. In less than 10 years, a million people will be living with dementia, soaring to 2 million by 2051. 
[Source: Alzheimer’s Society, 2016] 

The researchers found that those who reported drinking more caffeine than the average 261mg were 36% less likely to develop these conditions than those who drank less than the average amount. 

They said the study findings ‘are consistent with the existing literature showing an inverse association between caffeine intake and age-related cognitive impairment.’ 

Alzheimer’s Society research and development director Doug Brown said: ‘We now need to see robust trials to test whether putting the kettle on for those extra cups of tea or coffee could be a good way to reduce the risk of developing dementia.’ 


Driscoll I et al (2016). Relationships Between Caffeine Intake and Risk for Probable Dementia or Global Cognitive Impairment: The Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study. The Journals of Gerontology. doi:10.1093/gerona/glw180

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