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Cycling to work lowers risk of premature death by 40%

New study results suggest cycling to work is associated with a 45% lower risk of developing cancer and a 46% lower risk of heart disease, compared to a non-active commute.
Cycle_to_work-iStock.jpg

New study results suggest cycling to work is associated with a 45% lower risk of developing cancer and a 46% lower risk of heart disease, compared to a non-active commute.

Between 2007 and 2010, researchers from the University of Glasgow analysed data from 264,337 participants from UK Biobank: a database of biological information on British adults aged 40-69.

Participants were asked to record the types of transport they used to get to and from work on a typical day, including walking, cycling and non-active transport, such as a car or train.

Lower mortality rate

During an average five-year follow up period, information on hospital admissions and deaths was recorded for the

...

New study results suggest cycling to work is associated with a 45% lower risk of developing cancer and a 46% lower risk of heart disease, compared to a non-active commute.


Participants were asked to record the types of transport they used to get to
and from work. Picture: iStock 

Between 2007 and 2010, researchers from the University of Glasgow analysed data from 264,337 participants from UK Biobank: a database of biological information on British adults aged 40-69.

Participants were asked to record the types of transport they used to get to and from work on a typical day, including walking, cycling and non-active transport, such as a car or train.

Lower mortality rate 

During an average five-year follow up period, information on hospital admissions and deaths was recorded for the observational study.

The study results showed that transport by cycling was associated with the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality, as well as lower risks of all causes of mortality and cancer. Overall, commuters who cycled were associated with a 41% lower risk of premature death.


Celis-Morales C et al (2017) Association between active commuting and incident cardiovascular disease, cancer, and mortality: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 2017;357:j1456.

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