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Chemicals in cigarette smoke shown to damage foetal liver cells

Chemicals found in cigarette smoke damage foetal liver cells, a study has found.
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Chemicals found in cigarette smoke damage foetal liver cells, a study has found

Chemicals found in cigarette smoke constitute a particular risk to the foetus if the mother smokes during pregnancy and can damage foetal liver cells, a study has shown.

Scientists say the potent cocktail of chemicals in cigarettes is particularly harmful to developing liver cells, and affects male and female foetuses differently.

A research team led by the University of Edinburgh developed a new way of studying the effects of maternal smoking on liver tissue, using embryonic stem cells.

10.6%

of mothers in England were recorded as smokers at the time of delivery in 2015-16, down from 11.4% in 2014-15.

Source: NHS Digital

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells – non-specialised cells that have

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