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Blood cancer patients better off at hospice than home: US survey

Patients with blood cancer needing end of life care are better off in a hospice than being cared for at home, a survey of US oncologists suggests.
blood cancer

Patients with blood cancer needing end of life care are better off in a hospice than being cared for at home, a survey of US oncologists suggests

Patients with blood cancer needing end of life care are better off in a hospice than being cared for at home, according to a survey of US oncologists.

The survey, published in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, mainly focused on home hospice care as it is the prevalent model of providing hospice care in the US.

A team of researchers from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute assessed the survey responses of 349 hematologic oncologists listed in the clinical directory of the American Society of Hematology and providing care for adult blood cancer patients.

Home care inadequate

...

Patients with blood cancer needing end of life care are better off in a hospice than being cared for at home, a survey of US oncologists suggests

blood cancer
US oncologists would refer patients to a hospice if transfusions were available.
Picture: iStock

Patients with blood cancer needing end of life care are better off in a hospice than being cared for at home, according to a survey of US oncologists.

The survey, published in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, mainly focused on home hospice care as it is the prevalent model of providing hospice care in the US.

A team of researchers from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute assessed the survey responses of 349 hematologic oncologists listed in the clinical directory of the American Society of Hematology and providing care for adult blood cancer patients.

Home care inadequate

The survey, which was carried out between September 2014 and January 2015, showed that 68% of hematologic oncologists strongly agreed hospice care in general is helpful for patients with blood cancer.

However, 46% felt that home hospice care is inadequate for their patients' needs compared with an inpatient hospice with round-the-clock care, with most stating that they would be more likely to refer patients if red blood cell and/or platelet transfusions were readily available.


Odejide O et al (2017) Why are patients with blood cancers more likely to die without hospice? CANCER. doi.wiley.com/10.1002/cncr.30735

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