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Anxiety and depression linked to more frequent migraines

Anxiety and depression can contribute to people experiencing more frequent migraines, a study in Taiwan suggests.

Anxiety and depression can contribute to people experiencing more frequent migraines, a study in Taiwan suggests

migraine
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Anxiety and depression can contribute to people experiencing more frequent migraines, a study suggests.

Researchers in Taiwan made a cross-sectional study of 588 outpatients, collating demographic and clinical data, including sleep characteristics.

Migraine frequency – categorised as one to four headache days a month, five to eight headache days per month, nine to 14 headache days per month, or 14 plus headache days per month – was compared with depression and anxiety symptoms, as indicated by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).

Poor sleep quality

BDI total scores were highest in patients with chronic migraines, followed by those with high frequency migraines.

Similar results were obtained for HADS scores.

BDI and HADS scores were independently related to high-frequency episodic and chronic migraine frequency, and to poor sleep quality.

The authors concluded that higher migraine frequency correlated with higher symptom scores of anxiety and depression.


Chu H-T et al (2017) Associations Between Depression/Anxiety and Headache Frequency in Migraineurs: A Cross-Sectional Study. Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain. doi: 10.1111/head.13215

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