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Progress in jeopardy as stroke strategy ends

The national stroke strategy for England ends this year. Clinical leaders say a replacement is needed to build on its achievements and tackle variations in treatment and care.
stroke

The national stroke strategy for England ends this year. Clinical leaders say a replacement is needed to build on its achievements and tackle variations in treatment and care

When 36-year-old company director Nathan Ridgard went to his local A&E with an ‘excruciating’ headache and neck pain he was told he had a severe migraine and was admitted for tests.

‘Unfortunately it was New Year’s Eve, the hospital was shockingly understaffed, no stroke consultant was on duty and though nurses were extremely caring, I’m certain none were stroke specialists,’ he recalls.

Mr Ridgard waited three days for a scan, which led to a diagnosis of stroke affecting his eyesight, movement and energy levels.

‘After a week I was sent home, scared and unable to

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