My job

60 seconds with Macmillan nurse consultant Claire Taylor

Be courageous and put yourself forward for as many opportunities as you can, says Macmillan nurse consultant in colorectal cancer Claire Taylor. 
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Be courageous and put yourself forward for as many opportunities as you can, says Macmillan nurse consultant in colorectal cancer Claire Taylor

Claire Taylor qualified as a nurse 30 years ago, gaining a Bachelor of Nursing degree at the University of Southampton. A Macmillan professional for more than 20 years, she has worked in a variety a clinical posts and has also been a lecturer in gastrointestinal (GI) nursing at Kings College London. Married with two teenage daughters, she has been in her current role as Macmillan nurse consultant in colorectal cancer at London North West Healthcare NHS Trust since April 2015.

What are your main work responsibilities? My role is 50% clinical, supporting people diagnosed with cancer and developing services for those living with and beyond cancer, and 50% research,

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Be courageous and put yourself forward for as many opportunities as you can, says Macmillan nurse consultant in colorectal cancer Claire Taylor 


You can learn so much from others by listening, says Claire Taylor. 

Claire Taylor qualified as a nurse 30 years ago, gaining a Bachelor of Nursing degree at the University of Southampton. A Macmillan professional for more than 20 years, she has worked in a variety a clinical posts and has also been a lecturer in gastrointestinal (GI) nursing at King’s College London. Married with two teenage daughters, she has been in her current role as Macmillan nurse consultant in colorectal cancer at London North West Healthcare NHS Trust since April 2015. 

What are your main work responsibilities?  
My role is 50% clinical, supporting people diagnosed with cancer and developing services for those living with and beyond cancer, and 50% research, education and management. 

How did you get your job?  
After identifying a need for this role, the trust approached Macmillan to help support it. I was working as a senior Macmillan clinical nurse specialist (CNS) at the time and was delighted to be appointed to the new role. 

Who are your clients/patients?
I support patients with complex colorectal cancer who are referred from around the UK to our specialist service at St Mark’s Hospital, as well as those experiencing GI consequences as a result of being diagnosed with cancer and those living with and beyond cancer.

What do you love about your job? 
Seeing people get better, getting on with their lives and starting to forget about cancer. I also love seeing staff develop in their roles.

What do you find most difficult? 
Not always being able to deliver the quality of care I would like.

How have you developed your skills in this role? 
I have undertaken a number of postgraduate qualifications, including an MSc in Nursing, a PhD and a teaching qualification. 

What has been your most formative career experience? 
My first role as a Macmillan colorectal cancer CNS in 1996. It was a new role, with only two other posts in the country, so it was an exciting time.

If you hadn’t become a nurse, what would you have done instead? 
I have always wanted to work in health care – I was wrapping my teddies in bandages from a young age. I went on a course to find out about nursing when I was 15 years old and have never looked back.

What is the best lesson nursing has taught you? 
That you can learn so much from others by listening to them.

What career advice would you give your younger self? 
Be more courageous and put yourself forward for more opportunities.

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