Career advice

Delivering person-centred care in police custody

From seeing a detainee who has collapsed in a cell to assessing someone’s fitness to be interviewed for murder, it's all in a day's work for police custody nurse Matt Peel.
Custody nurse

From seeing a detainee who has collapsed in a cell to assessing someone’s fitness to be interviewed for murder, it's all in a day's work for police custody nurse Matt Peel

The custody nurse role was introduced in 2003 following changes to legislation which allowed nurses and paramedics to care for people in police custody. Prior to this, the work was solely done by doctors.

The role of the custody nurse has developed significantly over the past 14 years, with nurses now undertaking the majority – in some areas up to 99% – of the work.

Vulnerable, chaotic

I have worked as a police custody nurse in West Yorkshire Police’s custody suites for five years. Initially I was employed by a private company, but

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