Clinical

Our clinical nursing articles aim to inform and educate nurse practitioners and students. This is achieved through the publication of peer-reviewed, evidence-based, relevant and topical articles.

Advocating for LGBTQ+ older adults: a review of the role of executive nurses

How to advocate for LGBTQ+ older adults and create safe and inclusive healthcare environments

Identifying the nurse characteristics that affect anticipated turnover

Identifying the nurse characteristics that affect anticipated turnover

Why you should read this article • To be aware of the proportion of nurses who intend to leave their current job • To recognise the nurse characteristics that can affect nurse turnover • To understand the factors that should be considered to improve nurse recruitment and retention Background Nurse turnover is a prevalent and serious issue in Jordan, with many nurses leaving their jobs to search for better opportunities outside the country. It is therefore important to assess anticipated nurse turnover and the factors that may affect this, to prevent the costly and unnecessary loss of staff. Aim To assess anticipated nurse turnover and its predictors, and to compare these between public and university-affiliated (teaching) hospitals. Method A descriptive, cross-sectional and comparative design was used. Anticipated nurse turnover was measured using the Anticipated Turnover Scale, which consists of 12 items related to a nurse’s intention to leave their job that are rated using a seven-point Likert-scale. Questionnaires were distributed to 280 nurses from three public hospitals and one university-affiliated hospital in the north of Jordan. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, multiple regression and independent t-tests. Results Questionnaire responses were received from 250 nurses, yielding a response rate of 89%. This study identified that 68% of respondents intended to leave their job. Being older, more experienced and with a higher level of education increased the likelihood of nurse turnover. Nurses working in the university-affiliated hospital had a higher intent to leave compared with those working in public hospitals. Conclusion This study found that a high proportion of nurses working in hospitals in the north of Jordan were considering leaving their jobs, and nurses’ characteristics had a significant role in determining anticipated turnover. The results of this study could provide policymakers and stakeholders in Jordan with guidance to develop policies and retention programmes that could improve nurses’ work environment and reduce turnover.

Moving evidence into practice with outcomes-driven acuity data

Why you should read this article: • To recognise that outcomes-driven acuity data provide a valid, objective and reliable measure of patient acuity and workload to support decisions about staffing • To acknowledge the critical need for nursing data to be used in the care process provided by nurses • To identify the requirement for nursing leaders to align the right number of resources, skills and competencies to individual patient care This article describes how driving evidence-based practice across the paediatric population using outcomes-driven acuity technology led to the formulation of a combined multihospital and health information technology acuity council. The cross-collaboration among acuity experts resulted in a pilot project being undertaken, implementing evidence-based practice using acuity data and expanding newborn and post-partum acuity outcome sets. The newborn acuity outcome set was expanded from four to seven outcomes, and the post-partum outcome set from nine to 12 outcomes. The revised outcome sets facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice to evaluate the effect of nursing care and practice on patient outcomes.

Using huddles to improve communication and teamwork in an instrument-processing department

Using huddles to improve communication and teamwork in an instrument-processing...

Why you should read this article:: • To enhance your awareness of the benefits of team huddles • To learn about the effects of a service improvement project that involved the implementation of daily huddles and huddle boards • To identify methods you could use to improve communication and teamwork in your area of practice Instrument-processing staff work in a fast-paced, high-risk environment and errors in any of their processes can have a significant effect on patient safety. Effective communication is essential to the maintenance of complex processes such as the cleaning, disinfection and sterilisation of surgical instruments. This article details a service improvement project that aimed to evaluate staff members’ perceptions of teamwork and communication before and after the implementation of team huddles in an instrument-processing department. A questionnaire was used to survey staff perceptions of teamwork and communication before and after the implementation of team huddles. The huddles included the use of a huddle board to standardise their content. While the survey did not identify any significant differences in staff perceptions before and after the implementation of the huddles, the department leaders noted significant improvements in the attitudes and engagement of staff members. The service improvement project demonstrated that structured team huddles can improve morale and efficiencies within departments through enhanced collaboration and communication.

Challenges and opportunities of the executive nurse director role in the UK

A scoping review exploring issues affecting directors’ ability to deliver the nursing agenda

Open access
Strengthening quality assurance by implementing an evidence-based revision of a ward accreditation programme

Strengthening quality assurance by implementing an evidence-based revision of a ward...

Why you should read this article: • To recognise the role of ward accreditation in ensuring healthcare organisations are providing safe and effective care • To enhance your knowledge of the elements of an effective ward accreditation programme that supports quality assurance • To understand how evidence-based changes can be implemented successfully in healthcare settings Ward accreditation is fundamental in contemporary healthcare delivery. One NHS trust in southwest England that had been placed in special measures introduced a ward accreditation programme – known as the ASPIRE programme – but the trust’s senior nursing leadership team raised concerns about the level of quality assurance provided. Therefore, the trust revised its newly created ward accreditation programme, referring to the evidence base to re-evaluate the metrics used for assessment. Five new elements, including direct registered nurse care time and ward climate, were introduced in the accreditation process. The revision improved confidence in the quality assurance provided by the programme, which became central to the trust’s overall improvement plans.

Using change management to implement barcode medicines administration technology

Using change management to implement barcode medicines administration technology

Complex projects, such as barcode technology implementation, require staff engagement

Effect of nurse managers’ leadership styles on predicted nurse turnover

Effect of nurse managers’ leadership styles on predicted nurse turnover

Understanding the effects of nurse managers’ leadership on turnover may improve retention

A preceptorship toolkit for nurse managers, teams and healthcare organisations

A preceptorship toolkit for nurse managers, teams and healthcare organisations

Researchers have developed a toolkit to develop and improve preceptorship

A nurse-led youth volunteering project to support older people on acute hospital wards

A nurse-led youth volunteering project to support older people on acute hospital wards

Young people volunteering on acute hospital wards can provide extra support to older patients

What the COVID-19 pandemic tells us about the need to develop resilience in the nursing workforce

What the COVID-19 pandemic tells us about the need to develop resilience in the nursing...

Most research on resilience in healthcare systems such as the NHS is based on organisational crises, such as nurse shortages, an ageing workforce and financial restrictions. However, nursing can learn lessons from the past to consider how to become more resilient, particularly considering the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. This article briefly looks at previous pandemics and disasters that have affected healthcare systems, as well as the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, and considers how nurse leaders can support staff and show organisational resilience during such emergencies. The article also discusses how nurse leaders can develop their own resilience.

Analysing the implementation and effects of safe staffing policies in acute hospitals

Analysing the implementation and effects of safe staffing policies in acute hospitals

This article examines the main findings of several high-profile inquiries and reports

Effect of authentic leadership on newly qualified nurses: a scoping review

A review on the relationships between authentic leaders and newly qualified nurses

Effect of e-learning on nurses’ continuing professional development

An exploration of nurses’ views on the value of e-learning

Quality of work life and work-family conflict: a cross-sectional study among nurses in...

The relationship between work-life quality and work-family conflict among nurses in Iran

Exploring the influence of the nursing and medical professions on policy and politics

Nursing Now and the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife, offer new opportunities

Implementing a quality improvement programme in a locality mental health service

How quality improvement programmes can be implemented successfully in your clinical area

How nurse leaders can support staff going through the menopause

The value of a workplace culture that supports women experiencing menopausal symptoms

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