Evidence and Practice

Clinical

Quality of work life and work-family conflict: a cross-sectional study among nurses in teaching hospitals

Quality of work life and work-family conflict: a cross-sectional study among nurses in...

Why you should read this article: • To improve your knowledge of the factors that affect a nurse’s quality of work life • To understand the factors that can contribute to increased work-family conflict in a nurse’s life • To develop strategies that you can implement to improve quality of work life and reduce work-family conflict in the lives of staff Background The nursing profession is known to induce high levels of stress, and being simultaneously engaged in a stressful professional occupation and having a family life can lead to work-family conflict. Healthcare providers require recruitment and retention strategies that preserve nurses’ quality of work-life and mitigate work-family conflict. Aim To investigate the relationship between quality of work-life and work-family conflict among hospital nurses in Iran, as well as the relationships between work-family conflict and quality of work life, and between age, professional experience, type of employment, work shift and marital status. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted among 378 nurses working in six Iranian teaching hospitals, who were selected using random quota sampling. Data on age, professional experience, type of employment, work shift and marital status was collected. The study questionnaire was based on the 53-item Quality of Work Life scale and the 18-item Work-Family Conflict scale. Correlations were established using Pearson’s chi-squared and eta-squared tests. Results A total of 93% of participants experienced moderate or high levels of work-family conflict and 83% had a low or moderate quality of work life. On average, the levels of work-family conflict and quality of work life were moderate. Quality of work life decreased with increasing work-family conflict. Conclusion Healthcare providers can use these results to inform their recruitment and retention strategies. Nurse managers can mitigate any adverse effects of work-family conflict on quality of work life by offering staff interventions such as short training courses on how to manage work-family conflict.

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Menopause

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Open access
Development of a hospital early warning score to end ‘escalation fatigue’

Development of a hospital early warning score to end ‘escalation fatigue’

Antrim Area HEWS has advanced the Northern Irish trust’s management of site-level pressure

Exploring the public perspectives of e-professionalism in nursing

Exploring public perspectives of e-professionalism in nursing

Public perceptions of the acceptability of nurses’ online behaviours and e-professionalism

CPD articles

Supporting staff who are second victims after adverse healthcare events

Supporting staff who are second victims after adverse healthcare events

It is important to be aware of the effects of adverse events on second victims

Chairing meetings

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An overview of how to lead and manage effective meetings

Teamwork in nursing: essential elements for practice

Teamwork in nursing: essential elements for practice

As any nurse working in the NHS knows, teamwork can be powerful. Successful teamwork can make a huge workload of unmanageable tasks manageable. However, unsuccessful teamwork can leave people struggling to cope. This article explores readers’ knowledge and skills related to teamwork and provides them with new skills and techniques to improve practice.

Action learning: staff development, implementing change, interdisciplinary working and leadership

Action learning: staff development, implementing change, interdisciplinary working and...

Action learning (AL) is a process that supports problem-solving by applying a questioning formula to challenge issues and prompt actions. Initially developed to support organisational change, AL is now recognised as a motivating and influencing process for team development, individual goal setting, change initiatives, quality improvement and leadership development. Learning from observation and practice is central to its approach, which lends itself to healthcare settings. It is especially useful to managers seeking to implement change, enhance quality and promote teamwork in multidisciplinary settings.

Importance of reflection in revalidation

Importance of reflection in revalidation

Reflection is a hallmark of professional practice and an important element of the Nursing and Midwifery Council revalidation process. Following two previous continuing professional development articles, on reflection and professional learning and on reflection and personal learning, this article will aim to explore the specific elements of reflection required for revalidation. This publication should help demystify and support registrants embarking on the process.

Applying the Data Protection Act 2018 and General Data Protection Regulation principles in healthcare settings

Applying the Data Protection Act 2018 and General Data Protection Regulation principles...

The Data Protection Act (DPA) of 1998 was radically updated in 2018 and since then there has been much media coverage about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Recent headlines have featured well known organisations that have been fined under the DPA 1998. This article describes the recent changes in data protection law, including the principles behind the DPA and GDPR, highlights patients’ rights and how nurses can advocate for the protection of patients’ personal data, and outlines nurses’ role in ensuring that the principles of data protection are implemented fully as part of patient care delivery.

Practice question

How can critical thinking make me a better nurse?

Critical thinking can help nurses provide excellent care and improve patient well-being

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