Evidence and Practice

Clinical

Managing capability in specialist nursing practice

How enhanced training and support can improve the capability management processes

Managing volunteers who support patients with dementia or cognitive impairment on acute hospital wards: the NURTURe model

Managing volunteers who support patients with dementia or cognitive impairment

This article discusses the development of the NURTURe model on an acute hospital ward

Iranian Nurse

Investigating the factors that influence Iranian nurses’ workplace happiness

Psychological capital, interactional justice, supervisor support and workplace happiness

Advocating for LGBTQ+ older adults: a review of the role of executive nurses

How to advocate for LGBTQ+ older adults and create safe and inclusive healthcare environments

Identifying the nurse characteristics that affect anticipated turnover

Identifying the nurse characteristics that affect anticipated turnover

Why you should read this article • To be aware of the proportion of nurses who intend to leave their current job • To recognise the nurse characteristics that can affect nurse turnover • To understand the factors that should be considered to improve nurse recruitment and retention Background Nurse turnover is a prevalent and serious issue in Jordan, with many nurses leaving their jobs to search for better opportunities outside the country. It is therefore important to assess anticipated nurse turnover and the factors that may affect this, to prevent the costly and unnecessary loss of staff. Aim To assess anticipated nurse turnover and its predictors, and to compare these between public and university-affiliated (teaching) hospitals. Method A descriptive, cross-sectional and comparative design was used. Anticipated nurse turnover was measured using the Anticipated Turnover Scale, which consists of 12 items related to a nurse’s intention to leave their job that are rated using a seven-point Likert-scale. Questionnaires were distributed to 280 nurses from three public hospitals and one university-affiliated hospital in the north of Jordan. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, multiple regression and independent t-tests. Results Questionnaire responses were received from 250 nurses, yielding a response rate of 89%. This study identified that 68% of respondents intended to leave their job. Being older, more experienced and with a higher level of education increased the likelihood of nurse turnover. Nurses working in the university-affiliated hospital had a higher intent to leave compared with those working in public hospitals. Conclusion This study found that a high proportion of nurses working in hospitals in the north of Jordan were considering leaving their jobs, and nurses’ characteristics had a significant role in determining anticipated turnover. The results of this study could provide policymakers and stakeholders in Jordan with guidance to develop policies and retention programmes that could improve nurses’ work environment and reduce turnover.

Moving evidence into practice with outcomes-driven acuity data

Why you should read this article: • To recognise that outcomes-driven acuity data provide a valid, objective and reliable measure of patient acuity and workload to support decisions about staffing • To acknowledge the critical need for nursing data to be used in the care process provided by nurses • To identify the requirement for nursing leaders to align the right number of resources, skills and competencies to individual patient care This article describes how driving evidence-based practice across the paediatric population using outcomes-driven acuity technology led to the formulation of a combined multihospital and health information technology acuity council. The cross-collaboration among acuity experts resulted in a pilot project being undertaken, implementing evidence-based practice using acuity data and expanding newborn and post-partum acuity outcome sets. The newborn acuity outcome set was expanded from four to seven outcomes, and the post-partum outcome set from nine to 12 outcomes. The revised outcome sets facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice to evaluate the effect of nursing care and practice on patient outcomes.

CPD articles

Compassionate leadership: how to support your team when fixing the problem seems impossible

Compassionate leadership: supporting your team when fixing the problem seems impossible

Adopting a more compassionate approach adds to a nurse manager’s leadership skills

Effective nurse leadership in times of crisis

Effective nurse leadership in times of crisis

Essential leadership skills and the importance of decision-making and emotional intelligence

Using Benner’s model of clinical competency to promote nursing leadership

Using Benner’s model of clinical competency to promote nursing leadership

This article explores the concept of leadership in health and social care

Supporting staff who are second victims after adverse healthcare events

Supporting staff who are second victims after adverse healthcare events

It is important to be aware of the effects of adverse events on second victims

Chairing meetings

Chairing and managing formal workplace meetings: skills for nurse leaders

An overview of how to lead and manage effective meetings

Teamwork in nursing: essential elements for practice

Teamwork in nursing: essential elements for practice

As any nurse working in the NHS knows, teamwork can be powerful. Successful teamwork can make a huge workload of unmanageable tasks manageable. However, unsuccessful teamwork can leave people struggling to cope. This article explores readers’ knowledge and skills related to teamwork and provides them with new skills and techniques to improve practice.

Practice question

How can critical thinking make me a better nurse?

Critical thinking can help nurses provide excellent care and improve patient well-being

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