Analysis

Care for children is changing

Transforming care has become a buzz phrase in the health service. Since NHS England’s Five-Year Forward View was published in autumn 2014 a great deal of interest has been expressed in changing services to improve care and save money

Transforming care has become a buzz phrase in the health service. Since NHS England’s Five-Year Forward View was published in autumn 2014 a great deal of interest has been expressed in changing services to improve care and save money.

According to the Nuffield Trust, however, services for children and young people have been neglected.

The think tank’s report, entitled The Future of Child Health Services, states that most examples of service changes involve the care of older people. Consequently, services for children tend to focus on acute care rather than on helping children, especially those with chronic long-term conditions, to stay well.

The Nuffield Trust report, published in February, highlights six issues:

  • A lack of capacity and capability in general practice to deal with children’s issues.
  • Insufficient access to high quality paediatric and child health expertise in the community.
  • Little communication and joint
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