Features

Putting wheezy children on a pathway to better health

Nurses have devised a programme that has cut the number of children re-admitted with breathing problems

Nurses have devised a programme that has cut the number of children re-admitted with breathing problems

  • Trust report revealed children with wheeze or asthma accounted for most admissions, but care was variable
  • Wheezy care pathway has led to reduction in number of emergency department readmissions
  • Find out how you could use this model to empower patients and families

Like many nurses across the country, paediatric junior sister Freydoh Rabin at Barnet Hospital’s children’s emergency department found her department increasingly hectic, with rising patient numbers.

‘Winter nights tended to be busiest, when just a few nurses might be treating up to 35 children, many with wheezy chests and breathing difficulties requiring in-patient admission,’ says Ms Rabin.

Indeed, a report from the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, of which

...

Want to read more?

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first three months:

  • Customisable clinical dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals including Nursing Children and Young People
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • NMC-compliant RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs