Reviews

Book review: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for People with Intellectual Disabilities

Chartered clinical psychologist/professor of psychology Karen McKenzie reviews Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for People with Intellectual Disabilities

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for People with Intellectual Disabilities

Andrew Jahoda, Biza Stenfert Kroese, Carol Pert

Palgrave Macmillan

£25.99 | 271pp

ISBN: 9781137478535

This book provides information on the theoretical underpinnings of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and associated developments such as mindfulness. It is not a ‘how to’ guide to CBT, but rather provides evidence and practice-based suggestions on how to develop and adapt CBT principles and approaches when working with clients with an intellectual disability.

The authors provide examples to illustrate their points and provide a link to a website that has resources and adaptations that they refer to in their book. The stages of therapy from the initial meeting, through assessment and formulation, early and later phases of therapy and endings are all covered

The text is well-written, informative and practical. Some of the suggested approaches will be familiar to professionals who already work with individuals with an intellectual disability, for example, using prompts, pictures and objects to help understanding of more abstract and complex concepts. 

Other approaches are likely to be helpful in the context of providing CBT, such as role play to help the client explore alternative perspectives. Equally, learning disability nurses who are considering undergoing CBT training are likely to find this book a helpful resource.


Reviewed by Karen McKenzie, chartered clinical psychologist/professor of psychology, University of Northumbria

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