Analysis

Senior nurses need to discuss whether the practice of intentional rounding continues

A new study suggests that intentional rounding is just a tick-box exercise, wastes nurses’ time and has little effect on patient care
Picture shows a female medic chatting to an older woman who is sitting up in a hospital bed. The article says the nursing profession needs to debate whether intentional rounding is the best way to deliver care to patients.

A new King's College London study suggests that intentional rounding is just a tick-box exercise, wastes nurses’ time and has little effect on patient care

  • Intentional rounding seen as just a tick-box exercise
  • It does little to improve patient care or promote the nurse-patient relationship
  • Rounding is poorly understood by staff and fails to encourage multidisciplinary care

Senior nurses should contribute to a national conversation about whether the widespread practice of intentional rounding should be discontinued in light of the latest evidence, researchers say.

A study by King’s College London says the practice, involving routine ward rounds, is just a tick-box exercise that does little to improve patient care.

Intentional rounding originated in

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