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Heavy alcohol use in adolescence alters brain electrical activity

Long term heavy alcohol use in adolescence alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain, say researchers from the University of Eastern Finland. 
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Long-term heavy alcohol use in adolescence alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain, say researchers from the University of Eastern Finland.

They analysed the effects of heavy drinking on the electrical activity and excitability of the cortex in 27 young people who had been heavy drinkers throughout adolescence, but who had not been diagnosed with a substance abuse disorder.

The results were compared with 25 control subjects, matched by age, gender and education, with little or no alcohol use. All study participants were aged 13-18 at the start of the study.

Significant alterations

At age 23-28 years, the participants’ brain activity was analysed using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. This method enabled the researchers to analyse

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