Editorial

COVID-19: uncertain times highlight the best of learning disability nursing

University students face a strange world of blended learning and social distancing, but their skills are going to be needed more than ever
Image illustrates the online interaction between new nursing students and their lecturer during the first week of term at university

University students face a strange world of blended learning and social distancing, but their skills are going to be needed more than ever

New students to learning disability nursing are always welcome as they embark on an exciting and challenging career.

As I look back to when I started my learning disability nursing career, I am reminded how wonderful it is.

In these unprecedented and uncertain times, however, new students will be beginning their learning disability nursing programme in very different circumstances.

Programmes for the foreseeable future will

University students face a strange world of blended learning and social distancing, but their skills are going to be needed more than ever


Picture: iStock

New students to learning disability nursing are always welcome as they embark on an exciting and challenging career. 

As I look back to when I started my learning disability nursing career, I am reminded how wonderful it is.

In these unprecedented and uncertain times, however, new students will be beginning their learning disability nursing programme in very different circumstances. 

Programmes for the foreseeable future will look different. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, learning has moved online with limited opportunities for any face-to-face social and learning contact between nursing students and lecturers. 

Getting to grips with social distancing requirements

Freshers’ week – usually a highlight for new nursing students – will look very different and has moved online as students get to grips with the social distancing requirements.

If on campus for clinical skills teaching – after being assessed as being safe to take place – it will look and feel different too. 

‘Freshers’ week – usually a highlight for new nursing students – will look very different as they get to grips with the social distancing requirements’

Nursing students continuing their studies will have experienced the realities of blended learning following the lockdown in March.

Learning disability nurses provide valuable learning opportunities for nursing students in their practice assessor role, while providing vital care and support in inpatient, residential and community settings.

Unwavering commitment to the needs of people with learning disabilities 

Learning disability nursing has, and always will, present challenges for those providing care and support.

The uncertain times and disruptions brought about because of the pandemic highlight the very best of learning disability nursing. The commitment and focus on the needs of people with learning disabilities, their families and carers and those of nursing students on clinical placement has never been as important as it is now. 

View our COVID-19 resource centre here


Michael Brown @Michael72997363 is consultant editor Learning Disability Practice, and professor of nursing, Queen’s University Belfast

 

 

 

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