My job

From burnout to a top job in nursing research: what I’ve learned

Senior nurse researcher Jill Maben shares her tips for a move into research

Lucy Cooper

Paediatric clinical research advanced nurse practitioner

Lucy Cooper talks about her inspiration and challenges

Sonia Duffy

‘While we treat diseases, we do not treat the root cause’

When and why did you develop an interest in research? During my master’s degree, I was able to publish my research thesis and was hooked on research.

Janet Carpenter

Pay attention to serendipity

When and why did you develop an interest in research? My first nursing job was as a staff nurse in an oncology intensive care unit and a bone marrow transplant unit taking care of patients who were participating in high intensity clinical trials. During my master’s degree, I worked as a research assistant for two faculty members whose research was making an impact at state and national levels, and I was able to lead a small research project of my own. During my doctoral and post-doctoral studies, my research interests continued to grow. I find great meaning and purpose in identifying and solving difficult problems through research.

‘Nursing can’t be done alone’

When and why did you develop an interest in research?

After completing my master’s thesis at Emory University in Georgia, United States, I realised that I enjoyed the precise and methodological approach of scientists in their pursuit of answering compelling health problems. I started out interested in children’s health and engagement of their families and I have maintained that initial interest in promoting health and preventing disease in children.

A passion for research

When and why did you develop an interest in research?

It was a passion of mine during my PhD studies at the University of Florida in the United States and continued to be a major priority as a junior faculty member at the University of California in San Francisco. I was one of the first researchers into pain in children.

Why work in nursing research?

Peggy Chinn and Jill Maben have enjoyed successful careers as nurse researchers, so we asked them for advice on how others might follow thier lead

Making a difference through research

Making a difference through research

JILL MABEN OBE is professor of nursing research at King’s College London (KCL). Until recently she was director of the National Nursing Research Unit (NNRU) at the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery at KCL. In June the unit moved to the Healthcare Organisation Workforce and Quality research group. Professor Maben, who is primarily a qualitative researcher, is recognised for conducting case studies and in-depth, observational research. She examines workforce, the work environment and the impact on patient care. She recently completed a national research study on single rooms in hospitals. She was named as one of Health Service Journal’s ‘Top 100 leaders’ in 2013 and was on HSJ’s first list of ‘Most inspirational women in healthcare’.

Research must be relevant to real life

JANE MILLS is Professor of Nursing at James Cook University, Australia and the director of its Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Research. She is an internationally recognised grounded theorist and has significant expertise in rural nursing.

A gift for engaging all types of patients

WITH A commitment and passion that go above and beyond the normal realms of work duties, it is hard to believe clinical research nurse Sheila Morris simply ‘fell into’ her career.

A gift for engaging all types of patients

WITH A commitment and passion that go above and beyond the normal realms of work duties, it is hard to believe clinical research nurse Sheila Morris simply ‘fell into’ her career.

How to be a pioneer in your chosen field

CAROL HAIGH, professor of nursing at Manchester Metropolitan University’s Research Institute for Health and Social Change, has more than 30 years’ experience of working in healthcare settings.

A passion for sleep measurement

IN ADDITION to being associate dean for scholarly affairs at the Yale School of...

‘Focus, read and be curious’

ELIZABETH ROSSER is professor of nursing and deputy dean (education) at Bournemouth...

Publishing can inspire research

MICHAEL TRAYNOR is professor of nursing policy at Middlesex University. After...

Using mixed methods

INITIAL PERUSAL of the content of this publication did not reveal anything new....

Doing Your Literature Review – Traditional and Systematic Techniques

A PLETHORA of books has appeared over the past few years on writing literature...

Fundamental Aspects of Research for Nurses

AS IDENTIFIED by the authors, this book takes a conventional approach to...

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