Careers

Career advice

Clinical research: how getting involved gives your professional development a boost

Tips for taking an active role in nurse research, and why it’s exciting and rewarding work

How to rebuild positivity and move forward even when you’re exhausted

COVID-19 pandemic has left nurses traumatised, but healing is possible

Why you should do a PhD: a nurse’s guide to entering the research world

Children’s cancer nurse Helen Pearson explains what motivates her academic work

Rachel Taylor with a research participant

Here’s why this is an exciting time to be a clinical research nurse

There is more guidance and support now for nurses who want to combine research with practice

Clinical academic nursing

How to build a career that combines clinical and research skills

Clinical academic nursing is relatively new but growing, with a career framework to match

Research should be part of nurses’ daily work

Trust creates new post of clinical professor to help nurses develop research skills

My job

From burnout to a top job in nursing research: what I’ve learned

Senior nurse researcher Jill Maben shares her tips for a move into research

Lucy Cooper

Paediatric clinical research advanced nurse practitioner

Lucy Cooper talks about her inspiration and challenges

Sonia Duffy

‘While we treat diseases, we do not treat the root cause’

When and why did you develop an interest in research? During my master’s degree, I was able to publish my research thesis and was hooked on research.

Janet Carpenter

Pay attention to serendipity

When and why did you develop an interest in research? My first nursing job was as a staff nurse in an oncology intensive care unit and a bone marrow transplant unit taking care of patients who were participating in high intensity clinical trials. During my master’s degree, I worked as a research assistant for two faculty members whose research was making an impact at state and national levels, and I was able to lead a small research project of my own. During my doctoral and post-doctoral studies, my research interests continued to grow. I find great meaning and purpose in identifying and solving difficult problems through research.

‘Nursing can’t be done alone’

When and why did you develop an interest in research?

After completing my master’s thesis at Emory University in Georgia, United States, I realised that I enjoyed the precise and methodological approach of scientists in their pursuit of answering compelling health problems. I started out interested in children’s health and engagement of their families and I have maintained that initial interest in promoting health and preventing disease in children.

A passion for research

When and why did you develop an interest in research?

It was a passion of mine during my PhD studies at the University of Florida in the United States and continued to be a major priority as a junior faculty member at the University of California in San Francisco. I was one of the first researchers into pain in children.