Careers

Career advice

Are you a super-helper? How to ditch the guilt and avoid burnout

Super-helpers won’t say no to helping people even when it affects their well-being

Becoming a leader: what I’ve learned about making change happen

Tips on effective leadership from a nurse who had ‘no plan B’ but challenged herself

Loneliness in leadership: how to deal with it and support colleagues

Discussing loneliness is often still taboo, with leaders keen to appear strong

Having trouble accessing clinical supervision? You’re not alone

How to overcome the barriers to supervision and help maintain a healthy workforce

Diversity in senior roles: a programme for aspiring black and minority ethnic leaders

How an NHS England Midlands scheme aims to improve representation and support staff

What is coaching and how can it help me take my career to the next level?

Find out what to expect from career coaching and how it can offer you fresh perspective

My job

What do clinical academic nurses do and would this dual role suit me?

How to use clinical experience to develop the evidence base that underpins patient care

From burnout to a top job in nursing research: what I’ve learned

Senior nurse researcher Jill Maben shares her tips for a move into research

Lucy Cooper

Paediatric clinical research advanced nurse practitioner

Lucy Cooper talks about her inspiration and challenges

Sonia Duffy

‘While we treat diseases, we do not treat the root cause’

When and why did you develop an interest in research? During my master’s degree, I was able to publish my research thesis and was hooked on research.

Janet Carpenter

Pay attention to serendipity

When and why did you develop an interest in research? My first nursing job was as a staff nurse in an oncology intensive care unit and a bone marrow transplant unit taking care of patients who were participating in high intensity clinical trials. During my master’s degree, I worked as a research assistant for two faculty members whose research was making an impact at state and national levels, and I was able to lead a small research project of my own. During my doctoral and post-doctoral studies, my research interests continued to grow. I find great meaning and purpose in identifying and solving difficult problems through research.

‘Nursing can’t be done alone’

When and why did you develop an interest in research?

After completing my master’s thesis at Emory University in Georgia, United States, I realised that I enjoyed the precise and methodological approach of scientists in their pursuit of answering compelling health problems. I started out interested in children’s health and engagement of their families and I have maintained that initial interest in promoting health and preventing disease in children.