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Recruitment and retention: staff survey reveals insights into crisis facing services

Study shows co-production and delivering person-centred care are good for staff too
Retention and recruitment

Study shows co-production and delivering person-centred care are good for staff too

Researchers surveyed 466 professionals caring for people with profound learning disabilities in residential and day settings. Validated survey instruments were used to measure their subjective sense of well-being and job satisfaction.

Two further surveys were undertaken looking at care and support practices in respondents workplaces. One focused on quality across the eight dimensions of person-centred care, the other measured the co-creation of care by questioning communication and relationships between staff and service users.

Caution urged

Analysis demonstrated highly significant statistical relationships between person-centred care and co-production, and respondents well-being and job satisfaction. Women reported lower levels of well-being and older people had greater job satisfaction.

Caution is needed. The study was cross-sectional and the direction of the causal relationship is not established it may be

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Study shows co-production and delivering person-centred care are good for staff too


Picture: Charles Milligan

Researchers surveyed 466 professionals caring for people with profound learning disabilities in residential and day settings. Validated survey instruments were used to measure their subjective sense of well-being and job satisfaction.

Two further surveys were undertaken looking at care and support practices in respondents’ workplaces. One focused on quality across the eight dimensions of person-centred care, the other measured the ‘co-creation of care’ by questioning communication and relationships between staff and service users.

Caution urged

Analysis demonstrated highly significant statistical relationships between person-centred care and co-production, and respondents’ well-being and job satisfaction. Women reported lower levels of well-being and older people had greater job satisfaction.

Caution is needed. The study was cross-sectional and the direction of the causal relationship is not established– it may be that staff who enjoy work and have better well-being are more likely to provide good personalised support. Nonetheless, it suggests investment in co-production and person-centred care may reduce work-related stress and staff burnout.


Reference


About the author

Dave Atkinson is an independent nurse consultant

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