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Recruitment and retention: staff survey reveals insights into crisis facing services

Study shows co-production and delivering person-centred care are good for staff too

Study shows co-production and delivering person-centred care are good for staff too


Picture: Charles Milligan

Researchers surveyed 466 professionals caring for people with profound learning disabilities in residential and day settings. Validated survey instruments were used to measure their subjective sense of well-being and job satisfaction.

Two further surveys were undertaken looking at care and support practices in respondents’ workplaces. One focused on quality across the eight dimensions of person-centred care, the other measured the ‘co-creation of care’ by questioning communication and relationships between staff and service users.

Caution urged

Analysis demonstrated highly significant statistical relationships between person-centred care and co-production, and respondents’ well-being and job satisfaction. Women reported lower levels of well-being and older people had greater job satisfaction.

Caution is needed. The study was cross-sectional and the direction of the causal relationship is not established– it may be that staff who enjoy work and have better well-being are more likely to provide good personalised support. Nonetheless, it suggests investment in co-production and person-centred care may reduce work-related stress and staff burnout.


Reference


About the author

Dave Atkinson is an independent nurse consultant

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