Analysis

Pinpointing and relieving stress in emergency departments

Working in an emergency department (ED) is a demanding and high-pressure job. Previous studies have suggested that ED staff may experience higher rates of anxiety, depression and burnout than their colleagues, but exactly what may be the triggers of the stress is less well known.

Working in an emergency department (ED) is a demanding and high-pressure job. Previous studies have suggested that ED staff may experience higher rates of anxiety, depression and burnout than their colleagues, but exactly what may be the triggers of the stress is less well known.

Researchers at the University of Sheffield recently carried out a literature review to dig deeper into what makes ED staff stressed. Factors such as high demand came up frequently in the 25 studies.

But a number of studies also found that other issues such as role ambiguity, low managerial and peer support, insufficient pay, lack of professional recognition and limited opportunities to attend educational conferences also contribute to burnout and compassion fatigue. Some of the studies included in the Emergency Medicine Journal (EMJ) review cited

...

Want to read more?

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first three months:

  • Customisable clinical dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals including Emergency Nurse
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • NMC-compliant RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs