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Tapeworm medicine may hold clue to new treatments for Parkinson’s

New treatments for Parkinson’s disease could be developed from a molecule found in a medicine used to treat tapeworm infections, a study suggests

New treatments for Parkinson’s disease could be developed from a molecule found in a medicine used to treat tapeworm infections, a study suggests.

Researchers at Cardiff University and the University of Dundee found the drug niclosamide is an effective activator of the PINK1 protein found in the human body.

Significant step

The malfunction of this protein is generally seen as one of the leading causes of Parkinson's disease, a long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system.

One in 500

people has Parkinson's disease – about 127,000 people in the UK. Most are 50 or over but younger people can get it too.

Source: Parkinson's UK.

Several previous studies have

...

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