Reviews

Understanding emotion at work

The book has many positive features though it does rely very much on UK and US illustrations for the points that it is attempting to convey. Emotions are rightly seen as part and parcel of everyday life in the work place. Anger, joy, sorrow, jealousy, anxiety… and all the other emotions are always simmering away under the surface and are the very things that make an organisation seem alive. The management of emotions in

organisations is a challenge for any person and there is no doubt that little if any training is ever given to managers to enable them to do this effectively. This book addresses these very topics and introduces the reader to very pertinent and challenging questions about the nature of emotions in the management of organisations.

The book makes use of ideas in psychology, sociology and organisational theory to explore various aspects of work situations. It looks at how emotion arises in situations to do with leadership, decision making and organisational change as well as the new ITC systems that now permeate organisations. It also addresses bullying, violence, sexual harassment and downsizing in the work place. There are particularly interesting chapters such as Virtual emotion, where consideration is given to emotions that can arise in the course of telecommuting; Emotion and decisions, where over-commitment to an idea and subsequent entrapment may

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organisations is a challenge for any person and there is no doubt that little if any training is ever given to managers to enable them to do this effectively. This book addresses these very topics and introduces the reader to very pertinent and challenging questions about the nature of emotions in the management of organisations.

The book makes use of ideas in psychology, sociology and organisational theory to explore various aspects of work situations. It looks at how emotion arises in situations to do with leadership, decision making and organisational change as well as the new ITC systems that now permeate organisations. It also addresses bullying, violence, sexual harassment and downsizing in the work place. There are particularly interesting chapters such as Virtual emotion, where consideration is given to emotions that can arise in the course of telecommuting; Emotion and decisions, where over-commitment to an idea and subsequent entrapment may characterise unsound decision making; Emotion and change, where resistance and anxiety may figure strongly when trying to introduce change into organisations; and Stress and emotion in the work place, which can be linked to illnesses such as heart disease.

One may be excused for thinking that reason permeates organisations and that emotions are an uncommon or marginal occurrence. However, the book dispels this notion as it demonstrates how emotions infuse most practices in organisational life. It is well illustrated, with good examples and reflects the positive benefits of emotions at work as well as the negative aspects.

The book is suitable for advanced undergraduates and postgraduates studying organisational behaviour, HRM or organisational psychology. For the general reader interested in understanding more about emotions in an organisational context, it is also relevant. It will be of particular interest to readers of Nurse Researcher since it addresses issues which of both person to person and organisational concern. Overall, this is an easy to read book that is well worth including in one’s library for instructive use.

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