Reviews

The handbook of narrative and psychotherapy: practice, theory and research

People have been telling their stories since time began and this book clearly demonstrates how such stories can be used in a therapeutic environment. This is an interesting and much-welcomed volume on a subject that has been growing strongly over the past ten to 15 years. From a practical perspective the book is well presented, is easy to follow and allows the reader to move quickly to the appropriate section. As an edited text, it brings together a range of internationally acknowledged experts in the field. Thus, under one umbrella we have a detailed and respected invaluable resource. The book draws together the strands of practice and how it is underpinned by theory together with the current research that help to explore, explain and develop the narrative as an intervention.

The book is neatly divided into five sections. The first section discusses why the narrative is important by giving differing perspectives and discourse. Three chapters help the reader to explore and conceptualise current issues and debates that help to give an understanding of narrative and its place in therapy. Part two contains five chapters that explore the practicalities of narrative in therapy and how they can be used in different approaches. One of the positive aspects of the book is that in each chapter in section two is supported by case materials that demonstrate how narrative is used. Section three begins to explore some of the research and how an examination of narrative can be used with a range of people and the implications of such use. Section four continues by examining narrative assessment strategies and the supporting research, and, finally, section five looks to the future and explores possible

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The book is neatly divided into five sections. The first section discusses why the narrative is important by giving differing perspectives and discourse. Three chapters help the reader to explore and conceptualise current issues and debates that help to give an understanding of narrative and its place in therapy. Part two contains five chapters that explore the practicalities of narrative in therapy and how they can be used in different approaches. One of the positive aspects of the book is that in each chapter in section two is supported by case materials that demonstrate how narrative is used. Section three begins to explore some of the research and how an examination of narrative can be used with a range of people and the implications of such use. Section four continues by examining narrative assessment strategies and the supporting research, and, finally, section five looks to the future and explores possible trends and directions.

I found this book an interesting read. It brings together a range of thoughts and ideas and helps to create an understanding of how storytelling can be used in a therapeutic environment. The inclusion of case material helps the reader to qualify his or her thoughts. This book would be very useful for both undergraduate and postgraduate students in nursing, psychotherapy, social work, psychiatry, and would be a useful resource in any library.

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