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NMC’s new standards strengthen links between theory and practice

Lecturer Hannah Bryant welcomes new standards from the NMC that set out the skills and knowledge required by the next generation of nurses

Lecturer Hannah Bryant welcomes new standards from the NMC that set out the skills and knowledge required by the next generation of nurses

Illustration shows a figure overlaid by a jigsaw pattern, wearing a scholar’s cap and gown, representing joined up education. Lecturer Hannah Bryant welcomes new NMC standards that set out skills and knowledge required by the next generation of nurses.
Picture: iStock

This year saw the launch of new standards by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

They set out the skills and knowledge the next generation of nurses will need to deliver the best possible care in our ever-changing healthcare environment.

The standards seek to provide greater understanding across all four fields of nursing practice, bringing together mental health, learning disability, adult and children's nursing students.

Nursing students in these fields will be training alongside each other rather than in isolation, providing opportunities for shared learning and development in addition to strengthening teamwork and leadership – all invaluable skills for the emergency department.

This is particularly useful as many patients have complex backgrounds, for example adult patients presenting in the emergency department with medical or surgical issues may also have mental health or learning disability needs.

The standards are embedded with a variety of extra extended skills and simulation offering early learning opportunities.

‘They will enable nurses to consider specialising much earlier in their careers’

These opportunities will enable nurses to consider specialising much earlier in their careers, which is particularly useful in clinical areas, where staff frequently take on extended roles.

There is a noteworthy change to the supervisory roles of clinical and academic staff supporting students: clinical practice supervisors will know their students’ academic supervisor.

This will help to strengthen links between theory and practice and allow practice assessors access to information on students’ academic progress, enabling more structured learning plans to be formulated.

The academic assessor will work in partnership with the practice assessor to evaluate and recommend the student for progression for each part of the educational programme.

Collaboration between the academic setting and practice is crucial.

While universities will seek to provide students with simulated exposure and the underlying academic knowledge required for practice, it is not until students undertake clinical practice that they can truly master the ability to plan and deliver care.


Picture of Hannah Bryant, an adult nurse university lecturer at Birmingham City University, who welcomes new standards from the NMC that set out the skills and knowledge required by the next generation of nurses.Hannah Bryant is an adult nurse university lecturer at Birmingham City University           

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