James Buchan

James Buchan
Nursing Standard

James Buchan

James Buchan

Vote regret
Nursing Standard

Vote Brexit in haste and repent at leisure?

As the dust settles on the UK's decision to leave the EU, broken election promises,...

Nursing Standard

Workforce

The Observer newspaper recently reported that the UK is in the throes of a housing crisis.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

The Migration Advisory Committee has spoken. It has – somewhat reluctantly – given the Department of Health what it regards as a ‘get out of jail card’.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

May 1951, London. The KGB spies Burgess and Maclean must elude their MI5 watchers if they are to escape to Moscow. Their Russian handlers have a cunning plan.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

‘Current arrangements for managing the supply of NHS clinical staff do not represent value for money.’ This was the worrying conclusion of the National Audit Office report on NHS workforce planning, published in late January.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

Nurse shortages are back – if they ever really went away. This was reinforced by two reports published either side of the new year.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

The turn of the year is probably not the best time to be reminded that, if you are an NHS nurse, you have seen a pay cut of almost 10% in real terms since 2008.

Nursing Standard

A recommended read…

Regular contributors to Nursing Standard suggest some novels you might enjoy over the holiday period

Nursing Standard

Workforce

You couldn’t make it up part one: a ‘tough on immigration’ government yields to employer pressure and enables higher levels of international nurse recruitment by putting nursing on the immigration shortage list.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

Those of us with long enough memories can recall when enrolled nurses were a major part of the workforce.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

The UK’s ageing population frames any debate about the future of the NHS. It is driving up demand for services, and can contribute to a lower tax base for funding.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

Before Twitter, publishing a letter in the Times newspaper was an effective way of connecting with the Establishment.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

Chancellor George Osborne’s July budget announcement about four more years of pay constraint for NHS nurses is as much a political calculation as a way of containing public expenditure; the cap on NHS pay increases will probably take us through to the next general election.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

When NHS England took over work on safe staffing guidance last month from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the nursing profession reacted with outrage.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

With almost three million registered nurses, the United States is the largest English-speaking nursing labour market in the world. Attracted by career prospects not available in their own countries, many nurses emigrate to the US, which also has the highest number of nurses working in advanced practice.

Nursing Standard

Workforce

The general election has once again raised the question of just how ‘united’ is the kingdom we live in.

Nursing Standard

Magnet nursing services recognition programme

Overview In an environment rife with controversy about patient safety in hospitals, medical error rates, and nursing shortages, consumers need to know how good the care is at their local hospitals. Nursing’s best kept secret is the single most effective mechanism for providing that type of comparative information to consumers, a seal of approval for quality nursing care: designation of magnet hospital status by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC). Magnet designation, or recognition of the ‘best’ hospitals, was conceived in the early 1980s when the American Academy of Nursing (AAN) conducted a study to identify which hospitals attracted and retained nurses, and which organisational features were shared by these successful hospitals, referred to as magnet hospitals. In the 1990s, the American Nurses Association (ANA), through the ANCC, established a formal programme to acknowledge excellence in nursing services: the Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program. The purpose of the current study is to examine whether hospitals selected for recognition by the ANCC application process -ANCC-accredited hospitals–are as successful in creating environments in which excellent nursing care is provided as the original AAN magnet hospitals were. We found that at ANCC-recognised magnet hospitals nurses had lower burnout rates and higher levels of job satisfaction, and gave the quality of care provided at their hospitals higher ratings than did nurses at the AAN magnet hospitals. Our findings validate the ability of the Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program to successfully identify hospitals that provide high-quality nursing care.

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