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It is healthy to grieve and reflect when a patient dies

A stigma remains in nursing over becoming emotional because a patient you cared for has died, but community nurse Clare Tinnion says grieving shows she has done her job well
Picture shows image in the shape of a heart in pastel colours. A community nurse says a stigma remains over becoming emotional because a patient you cared for has died, but argues that grieving shows she has done her job well.

A stigma remains in nursing over becoming emotional because a patient you cared for has died, but community nurse Clare Tinnion says grieving shows she has done her job well

In nursing, some stigma remains about feeling emotion. It can be perceived as not being good enough, or being unprofessional and too sensitive. During my training I even heard the question: ‘Why are you doing this job if you get upset?’

Thankfully, the tide is turning, or at least it is changing in the community team I work in. Recently I experienced the death of a patient I had cared for on an almost daily basis as a community nurse for two years. I had known her for five years.

I provided her and her husband and carer with emotional support up until her death.

Each death I have previously

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