Features

How to identify trauma in children and what you can do about it

Tips for general practice nurses, school nurses and health visitors on how to pick up on and alleviate emotional trauma in young people
Picture shows a boy drawing as part of therapy. School nurses, health visitors, and general practice nurses are often in a position to identify the damage due to trauma from adverse childhood experiences and the effect on children’s mental health.

Tips for general practice nurses, school nurses and health visitors on how to pick up on and alleviate emotional trauma in young people

  • Adverse childhood experiences include verbal, physical and sexual abuse, and neglect
  • Children may feel uncomfortable talking about trauma to their friends or teachers
  • Nurses in these roles need to make more of their own potential for tackling these issues

School nurses, health visitors and general practice nurses are often in a position to identify the damage due to trauma from adverse childhood experiences and the effect on children’s mental health, says Queen’s Nurse and RCN fellow Ruth Oshikanlu.

‘Often, I’ve found that you just need to probe slightly and the whole surface bravado crumbles, so that you find that a child has been bullied or there is something going on in their home

...

Want to read more?

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first three months:

  • Customisable clinical dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals including Primary Health Care
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • NMC-compliant RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs