My job

Enjoy it or change it

Specialist health visitor and QN, Trudi Law on why a personal loss made her realise a supporting care role would be a good fit for her.

Specialist health visitor and QN, Trudi Law on why a personal loss made her realise a supporting care role would be a good fit for her.

What is your job?

I am a specialist health visitor employed by The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust. My responsibility is to deliver a health visiting service to homeless families in Wolverhampton and to ensure they can access the Healthy Child Programme. I complete a holistic assessment to identify health needs and vulnerability factors to find ways to lessen the impact of homelessness.

This group have poorer health outcomes, so I continually try to find innovative ways to improve health outcomes for children and their parents.

Why did you become a nurse?

At the age of nine, I was involved in a horrific road traffic accident which killed my father. The compassion

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Specialist health visitor and QN, Trudi Law on why a personal loss made her realise a supporting care role would be a good fit for her.

What is your job?

I am a specialist health visitor employed by The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust. My responsibility is to deliver a health visiting service to homeless families in Wolverhampton and to ensure they can access the Healthy Child Programme. I complete a holistic assessment to identify health needs and vulnerability factors to find ways to lessen the impact of homelessness.

This group have poorer health outcomes, so I continually try to find innovative ways to improve health outcomes for children and their parents.

Why did you become a nurse?

At the age of nine, I was involved in a horrific road traffic accident which killed my father. The compassion and care shown to me at that time made me realise I wanted to take on a caring role – supporting people at the most difficult times. At 17, I volunteered at a local long-stay hospital. Many of the children were disabled and I helped with basic care. These experiences led me into the nursing profession.

Where did you train?

I trained in Wolverhampton. We practiced procedures on each other as there were no mannequins. Injection technique was practiced on an orange and we had to memorise the drips per minute on infusions, as there were no electric delivery devices. As students, we served meals and talked to patients as there was evidence to show it was beneficial to their recovery. I trained as a midwife in 1991 and as a health visitor in 1995.

What do you enjoy most about your job?

The challenge of enabling families to prioritise their health needs and empowering them to be independent at managing health issues. I see individuals who have experienced horrific events in their lives and watch them gain confidence as they make the steps towards independent living. To share their journey and support their health needs is the most enjoyable part of the job.

What has given you the most satisfaction?

Families often arrive in the hostel or refuge with few belongings and little self-esteem, but they leave with a huge sense of achievement. Once they have moved into their new property, the final visit is the most satisfying. The new properties are often sparsely furnished.

I will never forget the little girl who took my hand to show me her room at her new house and said proudly 'look at my beautiful bedroom'. It was an empty room with no carpets, no curtains, no bed and no toys. This role shows me how resilient and determined humans can be.

What nursing achievement makes you most proud?

Becoming a Queen’s Nurse. This is awarded to community nurses who can demonstrate a commitment to continuous improvement in patient care. It has been one of my greatest nursing achievements as it champions the work I do to improve health outcomes for families.

What or who inspires you, and why?

During my health visitor training, Bridie, my community practice teacher. She has continued to inspire and support me over the last 21 years. She exudes a passion for health visiting like no one I have ever met. We meet up regularly to reminisce and discuss the challenges in health visiting today.

Outside work what do you enjoy doing?

I enjoy spa breaks with my sister, baking, reading and eating out. I have recently taken up yoga which recharges my batteries. It is relaxing, mindful and energising.

What advice would give a newly-registered nurse?

If you are not happy in your job, change it. A career lasts a long time, you deserve to enjoy it and feel fulfilled. Our clients deserve to feel valued and that we are fully committed to meeting their needs.


Find out more about becoming a Queen’s Nurse here

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