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Submitting a written statement: what you need to know

The RCN’s quick reference guide will help you to avoid the common pitfalls

The RCN’s quick reference guide will help you to avoid the common pitfalls

There are many occasions during a nurse’s career when they may be requested to provide a written statement.

This could be for an inquest, as a witness to an incident involving a patient or colleague, for staff under investigation for an adverse incident, to raise concerns and, rarely, a police statement in criminal proceedings.

Guidance on written statements now available

Roz Hooper. Picture: John Houlihan

Being asked to produce a written account can be a daunting prospect for a nurse who is uncertain of how to go about it.

Getting a statement right

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