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Use local suicide prevention plans, urges mental health charity chief

Mind chief executive Paul Farmer said local suicide prevention plans will only succeed if stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, engage with them.
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The chief executive of a mental health charity has urged health professionals and others to make use of their local suicide prevention plans.

Paul Farmer, of charity Mind, addressed a suicide prevention conference at the University of Salford on 17 January.

He urged delegates, who included healthcare professionals, to make use of suicide prevention plans. The plans are normally developed by a variety of agencies including NHS trusts and clinical commissioning groups, councils and the police.

Suicide reduction plan

Mr Farmer said: After a slow start, 95% of local authorities have a plan or a plan in development. They should not be sitting on a dusty shelf. They only work if there is the engagement from interested stakeholders.

The governments five-year forward view

The chief executive of a mental health charity has urged health professionals and others to make use of their local suicide prevention plans.


Mind chief executive Paul Farmer has urged healthcare professionals
to use suicide prevention plans. Picture: Tim George

Paul Farmer, of charity Mind, addressed a suicide prevention conference at the University of Salford on 17 January.

He urged delegates, who included healthcare professionals, to make use of suicide prevention plans. The plans are normally developed by a variety of agencies including NHS trusts and clinical commissioning groups, councils and the police. 

Suicide reduction plan

Mr Farmer said: ‘After a slow start, 95% of local authorities have a plan or a plan in development. They should not be sitting on a dusty shelf. They only work if there is the engagement from interested stakeholders.’

The government’s five-year forward view for mental health has set a goal of reducing the number of suicides in England by 10% by 2020-21. 

Guidance by Public Health England said measures including the frequency of help-seeking behaviour, such as calling telephone helplines and engagement with healthcare services, should be monitored as part of suicide prevention plans. 


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