CPD articles

Our continuing professional development (CPD) articles are designed to assist with your nursing skills and practice.

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 3. Helping service users cope with schizophrenia

Well-being, physical and mental health: Helping service users cope with schizophrenia

Part 3 of our series explores the causes of schizophrenia and how it can lead to self-neglect

Nursing care plans in mental health

Nursing care plans in mental health

An exploration of best practice in co-creating recovery-orientated care plans

Improving the physical health of people with a mental illness: holistic nursing assessments

Improving physical health of people with mental illness: holistic nursing assessments

People with a mental illness are more susceptible to physical ill health

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 2. Responding to trauma

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 2. Responding to trauma

Mental and physical health work together to support well-being, and never more importantly than when a patient experiences a sudden and devastating trauma. This article explores the interplay of mental and physical health in the context of acid attack burns to someone’s face. It explains trauma in event terms and how an understanding of types of psychological trauma can be drawn on to advance collaborative nursing practice in a burns unit. While nurses have been educated in separate disciplines, it is argued that working across the traditional divide can be advantageous in trauma situations. This is the second article in a series on ‘well-being, physical and mental health’.

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 1

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 1

This article explains how physical health fits into the overall well-being of a person and why people with a mental illness are more likely than the rest of the population to experience poor physical health. It represents the first article in a series on body and mind, well-being and how physical and mental health issues interact as focal points for the work of mental health nurses. Historically, mental health and physical health have been conceived in western healthcare as separate domains and our preparation of registered nurses for practice has often reflected this. However, in this series, case studies are used to show how closely physical and mental health interact and how the two are important to sustain a state of well-being. The series is designed to help registered nurses reflect on their current practice and to help students to anticipate the range of care requirements that may be needed when a service user comes into their care.

Solution oriented learning: an innovative approach that promotes motivation and resilience

Solution-oriented learning: an approach that promotes motivation and resilience

This article explores the use of solution-oriented learning as an approach to coping with formal learning and practice development needs. The article explains each step of the solution-oriented learning process and gives examples related to student and qualified nurses’ experiences. Time out activities offer opportunities to apply theory to practice. The authors propose that wider application of the solution-oriented learning principles can support nurses in building resilience.

Supporting women with mental health issues

Supporting women with mental health issues

The number of women experiencing mental ill health has increased, with young women more likely to experience mental distress than their male peers. Despite this, few NHS mental health trusts have a women’s mental health strategy in place, which suggests that there are opportunities to improve the skills and confidence of staff supporting women in mental health services. This article explores mental health issues experienced by women and aims to help staff develop a gender-informed understanding of mental healthcare to help improve the care of women.

Restraint

Understanding and implementing the nurse’s holding power (section 5(4)) of the Mental...

This article explores section 5(4) of the Mental Health Act, which permits nurses of a ‘prescribed class’ to detain an informal inpatient who is receiving treatment for mental disorder for up to six hours or until a doctor or approved clinician arrives. The article raises various issues in relation to the implementation of section 5(4), some, but not all of which are addressed by the relevant codes of practice for England and Wales. The authors raise important questions that nurses need to address if their holding power is to be applied appropriately in all cases.

Oral hygeine

Physical healthcare needs: oral hygiene in the mental health setting

Nurses need to understand the importance of oral hygiene because of its effects on the individual’s quality of life. This requires thorough oral assessment, effective dental care and awareness of factors that may compromise oral health of clients. The importance of obtaining consent, maintaining dignity and privacy during any procedures, and consistent interpersonal and manual skills are emphasised.

Self-awareness

Exploring self-awareness in mental health practice

Self-awareness is integral to the development of mental health practitioners. This article defines the concept and considers how it can be nurtured, particularly in newly qualified nurses.

Eye movement

Eye movement desensitisation reprocessing (EMDR)

Aims and intended learning outcomes This article discusses one of the trauma-focused psychological therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that was recently recommended by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence ( NICE 2005 ). After reading this article, you will be able to: ■ Define what eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) stands for and its intended use; ■ Describe how the EMDR protocol is implemented with the patient; ■ Describe what other psychological therapies EMDR has been tested against ■ Describe who is eligible for training in EMDR and the training process.

Depression

Managing depression: an overview

Depression is a common health problem but it is both under-detected and under-treated. It is a complex condition with no single known cause: biological, social and psychological factors all influence the illness which can vary in severity and duration. There are a range of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions which are safe and effective and prevent relapse.

Alzheimer’s disease: caring for the carers

Support from carers is a key factor in the community care of people with dementia, but the...

Management of aggression and violence in mental health settings

This article employs recently published material to reflect on issues relating to the...

National nursing leadership programme

The NHS Plan ( DoH 2000 ) clearly articulates the need to modernise the health service in...

Understanding and working with bereavement

Although we all experience bereavement at some point in our lives, the experience of...

Depression: Nature, assessment and treatment using behavioural activation (Part 2)

This is the second in a two-part Continuing Professional Development article on behavioural...

Depression: Nature, assessment and treatment using behavioural activation (Part 1)

This two-part Continuing Professional Development article presents the treatment of...

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