Evidence and Practice

Clinical

Alcohol use of UK military personnel during active service and on return to civilian life: veterans’ experiences

Veterans’ experiences of alcohol use of UK military personnel

On leaving active service, veterans should be provided with greater mental health support

Use of a mnemonic to support suicide intervention training for nursing students

Use of a mnemonic to support suicide intervention training for nursing students

Update your knowledge of the nurse’s role in suicide assessment and management

Effects of a mindfulness-based stress reduction group programme on family carers

Effects of a mindfulness-based stress reduction group programme on family carers

Study identified that mindfulness skills can be used in various ways in family carers’ lives

An interprofessional practice development group for newly qualified and new-to-role clinicians in community mental health

An interprofessional practice development group for newly qualified and new-to-role...

There is a wealth of literature focusing on the transition from being a new graduate to being a newly qualified member of staff. However, the needs of the new-to-role practitioner, who may be expected to manage challenging caseloads and coordinate care, are rarely explored. New-to-role mental health clinicians, particularly in the community, can work alone and experience complex challenges. To meet these demands, an interprofessional practice development group was formed. Clinical practice educators, alongside clinical team managers, designed a programme of six sessions of three hours to be delivered over a six-month period. The programme was delivered to two cohorts of new-to-role or newly qualified mental health staff from a nursing, occupational therapy or social work background. The sessions focused on the role of the care coordinator, on how the last month had been for participants and on discussing relevant articles and case studies. To evaluate the course, participants completed a pre- and post-group questionnaire. There was an improvement in their confidence and competence, but not in their skills.

Efficacy of mental health crisis houses compared with acute mental health wards: a literature review

Efficacy of mental health crisis houses compared with acute mental health wards: a...

Background Crisis houses are an alternative to acute psychiatric hospital admission. Aim To review evidence of the efficacy of mental health crisis houses as an alternative to acute hospital admissions. Method A systematic search of studies drawing on eight databases was undertaken, with a total of 135 articles identified. After the selection process, six quantitative and two qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria of the review. Of these, the quantitative studies were assessed for methodological quality using a 21-item tool and all studies were analysed using thematic synthesis. Findings Four of the studies were rated methodologically strong and two as methodologically moderate. It was found that people admitted to crisis houses experience fewer negative events, have more autonomy, receive more holistic care and spend more time with staff members. They also receive more peer support and report more therapeutic relationships with staff. Conclusion Service users who access crisis houses rather than acute wards tend to rate their recovery as lower and think that pharmacological treatments are less available. Crisis house admissions are shorter and less expensive than acute ward stays, but do not always prevent admission to hospital.

Rethinking concurrent disorders: implications and future directions for nursing practice

Rethinking concurrent disorders: implications and future directions for nursing practice

Concurrent disorders as conceptualised in academic literature and practice guidelines

CPD articles

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 3. Helping service users cope with schizophrenia

Well-being, physical and mental health: Helping service users cope with schizophrenia

Part 3 of our series explores the causes of schizophrenia and how it can lead to self-neglect

Nursing care plans in mental health

Nursing care plans in mental health

An exploration of best practice in co-creating recovery-orientated care plans

Improving the physical health of people with a mental illness: holistic nursing assessments

Improving physical health of people with mental illness: holistic nursing assessments

People with a mental illness are more susceptible to physical ill health

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 2. Responding to trauma

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 2. Responding to trauma

Mental and physical health work together to support well-being, and never more importantly than when a patient experiences a sudden and devastating trauma. This article explores the interplay of mental and physical health in the context of acid attack burns to someone’s face. It explains trauma in event terms and how an understanding of types of psychological trauma can be drawn on to advance collaborative nursing practice in a burns unit. While nurses have been educated in separate disciplines, it is argued that working across the traditional divide can be advantageous in trauma situations. This is the second article in a series on ‘well-being, physical and mental health’.

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 1

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 1

This article explains how physical health fits into the overall well-being of a person and why people with a mental illness are more likely than the rest of the population to experience poor physical health. It represents the first article in a series on body and mind, well-being and how physical and mental health issues interact as focal points for the work of mental health nurses. Historically, mental health and physical health have been conceived in western healthcare as separate domains and our preparation of registered nurses for practice has often reflected this. However, in this series, case studies are used to show how closely physical and mental health interact and how the two are important to sustain a state of well-being. The series is designed to help registered nurses reflect on their current practice and to help students to anticipate the range of care requirements that may be needed when a service user comes into their care.

Solution oriented learning: an innovative approach that promotes motivation and resilience

Solution-oriented learning: an approach that promotes motivation and resilience

This article explores the use of solution-oriented learning as an approach to coping with formal learning and practice development needs. The article explains each step of the solution-oriented learning process and gives examples related to student and qualified nurses’ experiences. Time out activities offer opportunities to apply theory to practice. The authors propose that wider application of the solution-oriented learning principles can support nurses in building resilience.

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