Evidence and Practice

Clinical

Staff perspectives on using the Recovery Star in mental health inpatient rehabilitation services

Staff perspectives on using the Recovery Star in mental health inpatient rehabilitation

Recovery Star is a staff tool to support recovery of adults using mental health services

Substance use disorder: evaluating the effectiveness of the Addiction Recovery Coaching exercise programme

Substance use disorder: evaluating the Addiction Recovery Coaching exercise programme

A service evaluation undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of the ARC exercise programme

Effects of dance on mood and potential of dance as a mental health intervention

Effects of dance on mood and potential of dance as a mental health intervention

Mental health nurses could consider using dance as a mental health intervention

A national survey of psychiatric intensive care, low secure and locked rehabilitation units

A national survey of psychiatric intensive care, low secure and locked rehabilitation...

Why you should read this article: • To learn about the differences between psychiatric intensive care, low secure and locked rehabilitation units • To understand how service provision in psychiatric intensive care, low secure and locked rehabilitation units has changed since 2006 • To gather information on the types of interventions offered by the different psychiatric intensive care facilities Psychiatric intensive care can take place in a variety of settings, including psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs), low secure units (LSUs) and locked rehabilitation units (LRUs). These units have a range of referral, admission and discharge care pathways, staffing profiles and core interventions. The aim of this service evaluation was to compare present provision in PICUs and LSUs with results from the first national survey of PICUs and LSUs in 2006. The service evaluation also aimed to define the role of LRUs. The authors used a cross-sectional, ‘census day’ questionnaire with six-month follow-up design. Overall, 111 NHS units participated in the evaluation. Results included that PICUs were smaller and usually had a mixed-sex distribution of service users; LSUs mostly comprised single-sex facilities; and LRUs mostly comprised single-sex units with a significantly longer mean length of stay than the other types of unit. PICUs primarily cared for service users exhibiting acute behavioural disturbance, first-episode psychosis or psychotic crisis and, compared with the other types of unit, more often used high-dose medication and electroconvulsive therapy.

Nurse leadership in implementing digital change in an Irish mental health service

Nurse leadership in implementing digital change in an Irish mental health service

The implementation of an electronic health record system in a private mental health service

Evaluating mental health nurses’ confidence in recognising a physically deteriorating...

How an Early Warning Score can support nurses to recognise when patients are deteriorating

CPD articles

Open access
Using team formulation in mental health practice

Using team formulation in mental health practice

Why you should read this article: • To understand the potential uses and benefits of team formulation in mental health practice • To be able to apply team formulation in your practice • To count towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD, or you may wish to write a reflective account (UK readers) • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers) Formulation is a process of developing an understanding of what is happening for a person and why, and therefore what might be helpful for them. It involves gathering information, drawing from personal meanings and theoretical understandings to develop a coherent narrative. Traditionally, formulation is undertaken by a practitioner and a service user on an individual basis, but it can also be undertaken in a team context. This article explores team formulation, outlining its ideas, implementation and potential effects. It describes some of the evidence, outlines some techniques that can be used and reflects on team formulation in practice. However, it is not a systematic review of the evidence. It is hoped that this process will enable readers to develop an enhanced awareness of the concepts and issues involved, feel more confident engaging in team formulation and recognise the challenges and value that it can bring to clinical practice.

Use of individual formulation in mental health practice

Use of individual formulation in mental health practice

To learn about two transdiagnostic models of formulation that you could use in your practice

Introducing mentalization and its role in mental health practice

Introducing mentalization and its role in mental health practice

How individuals learn to mentalize during childhood, and in response to stress

Using the STARTER model to talk about sex in mental health nursing practice

Using the STARTER model to talk about sex in mental health nursing practice

The STARTER model is a step-by-step tool encouraging conversations about sexual health

Implementing trauma-informed care in mental health services

Implementing trauma-informed care in mental health services

Mental health practitioners can support service users to move beyond traumatic events

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 3. Helping service users cope with schizophrenia

Well-being, physical and mental health: Helping service users cope with schizophrenia

Part 3 of our series explores the causes of schizophrenia and how it can lead to self-neglect

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