Evidence and Practice

Clinical

The ‘shift reflection’ model of group reflective practice: a pilot study in an acute mental health setting

The ‘shift reflection’ model of group reflective practice: a pilot study in an acute...

Why you should read this article: • To enhance your awareness of the challenges that mental health professionals commonly experience, and the support they require • To gain knowledge of the ‘shift reflection’ model of group reflective practice and its components • To understand the potential benefits of shift reflection for staff working in acute mental health settings Background ‘Shift reflection’ is a novel, structured method of group reflective practice at the end of a shift. It involves a facilitator asking open questions about the shift, then using a mapping process to draw and make connections between the experiences of staff. Aim To undertake a pilot study of shift reflection in an acute mental health unit and to gather feedback from staff and service users on its effect on staff well-being, teamwork and ward culture. Method A mixed-methods design was used. Staff members provided feedback using the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) scale, completed pre-pilot (n=10) and post-pilot (n=14), a staff feedback questionnaire (n=14) and a focus group (n=7). Data from the questionnaires were examined using descriptive statistics and effect sizes, while the focus group data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings The preliminary findings suggest that shift reflection was effective in supporting staff and that it improved team cohesion and morale. The ProQOL scale results indicated a small increase in compassion satisfaction, a medium reduction in secondary traumatic stress and a large reduction in burnout scores post-pilot. Five themes emerged from the focus group: value of shift reflection; team benefits; supportive role of facilitation; implementation challenges; and future directions. Conclusion While several challenges in implementing shift reflection were identified, the findings of this pilot study provide a foundation for developing and testing its effectiveness in future research.

Differentiating between borderline personality disorder and autism spectrum disorder

Differentiating between borderline personality disorder and autism spectrum disorder

Why you should read this article • To enhance your knowledge of the similarities and differences between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) • To assist you in developing effective treatment and management plans for people with BPD and/or ASD • To understand the complexities involved in diagnosing and managing people with co-morbid BPD and ASD One of the main issues that people with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience is that they find emotional and relational interactions challenging. This article reviews the available literature on the similarities and differences between BPD and ASD, and aims to raise awareness of the complexity of co-morbid presentations. This is important because, if a person’s diagnosis is inaccurate or incomplete, their treatment may be ineffective or inappropriate. The authors provide practical guidelines to assist front-line mental health practitioners in diagnosing BPD and/or ASD, thereby enabling them to develop appropriate and effective management plans. These guidelines were drawn from the available literature and the authors’ experience in clinical practice. When BPD and ASD co-occur, a formulation approach should be used to provide person-centred care, rather than an assessment approach that simply defines the issues a person is experiencing.

Three issues for mental health nurse educators preparing new preregistration programmes

Three issues for mental health nurse educators preparing new preregistration programmes

Areas nurse educators need to address when developing preregistration nursing programmes

Sensory modulation in mental health practice

Sensory modulation in mental health practice

An introduction to sensory modulation, identifying optimal practice and requirements

Timely diagnosis and disclosure of dementia for patients and their families: exploring the views of GPs

Timely diagnosis and disclosure of dementia for patients and their families

Mental health nurses have an important role in providing expertise to GPs

Alcohol use of UK military personnel during active service and on return to civilian life: veterans’ experiences

Veterans’ experiences of alcohol use of UK military personnel

On leaving active service, veterans should be provided with greater mental health support

CPD articles

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 3. Helping service users cope with schizophrenia

Well-being, physical and mental health: Helping service users cope with schizophrenia

Part 3 of our series explores the causes of schizophrenia and how it can lead to self-neglect

Nursing care plans in mental health

Nursing care plans in mental health

An exploration of best practice in co-creating recovery-orientated care plans

Improving the physical health of people with a mental illness: holistic nursing assessments

Improving physical health of people with mental illness: holistic nursing assessments

People with a mental illness are more susceptible to physical ill health

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 2. Responding to trauma

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 2. Responding to trauma

Mental and physical health work together to support well-being, and never more importantly than when a patient experiences a sudden and devastating trauma. This article explores the interplay of mental and physical health in the context of acid attack burns to someone’s face. It explains trauma in event terms and how an understanding of types of psychological trauma can be drawn on to advance collaborative nursing practice in a burns unit. While nurses have been educated in separate disciplines, it is argued that working across the traditional divide can be advantageous in trauma situations. This is the second article in a series on ‘well-being, physical and mental health’.

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 1

Well-being, physical and mental health: part 1

This article explains how physical health fits into the overall well-being of a person and why people with a mental illness are more likely than the rest of the population to experience poor physical health. It represents the first article in a series on body and mind, well-being and how physical and mental health issues interact as focal points for the work of mental health nurses. Historically, mental health and physical health have been conceived in western healthcare as separate domains and our preparation of registered nurses for practice has often reflected this. However, in this series, case studies are used to show how closely physical and mental health interact and how the two are important to sustain a state of well-being. The series is designed to help registered nurses reflect on their current practice and to help students to anticipate the range of care requirements that may be needed when a service user comes into their care.

Solution oriented learning: an innovative approach that promotes motivation and resilience

Solution-oriented learning: an approach that promotes motivation and resilience

This article explores the use of solution-oriented learning as an approach to coping with formal learning and practice development needs. The article explains each step of the solution-oriented learning process and gives examples related to student and qualified nurses’ experiences. Time out activities offer opportunities to apply theory to practice. The authors propose that wider application of the solution-oriented learning principles can support nurses in building resilience.

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