Comment

Making chemotherapy services an attractive career choice

A drop in the numbers of those training to be nurses will be felt across all services, but the specialised work of chemotherapy provision will be hit particularly hard.
Nurse treating chemotherapy patient

A drop in the numbers of those training to be nurses will be felt across all services, but the specialised work of chemotherapy provision will be hit particularly hard.

Nursing workforce issues are never too far from the headlines and finding solutions is not easy. I believe we all have a role to play. It seems logical that if the students don't come into training posts then there will be shortages at all levels of nursing over time.

Another reduction in the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) applications for nursing courses in England and Wales this year is a cause for concern. Although cancer patients are cared for by nurses in every service, some aspects, such as chemotherapy administration, remain highly specialised. While workforce planning often focuses generically on services and roles, I don't see much about future planning for chemotherapy

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