Research news

Ovarian cancer risk linked to missing bacteria

Lower levels of a protective bacteria put women at greater risk of developing ovarian cancer, a study suggests
Picture shows artwork depicting the enzyme human ARTD2 (pink) complexed with Olaparib cancer drug (green).

Lower levels of a protective bacteria put women at greater risk of developing ovarian cancer, a study suggests

Women at high risk of developing ovarian cancer have lower levels of protective ‘friendly’ vaginal bacteria, as do women diagnosed with the disease, a study suggests.

Changes in the number of healthy bacteria, called lactobacilli, which normally help prevent overgrowth of other ‘unfriendly’ types of bacteria, can be used to build a clearer picture of a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to the study, led by University College London’s EGA Institute for Women’s Health.

Women with ovarian cancer had a significant reduction in vaginal lactobacilli, the researchers found. This reduction was also seen in women with a 40 times higher risk of developing ovarian cancer in

...

Want to read more?

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first three months:

  • Customisable clinical dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals including Cancer Nursing Practice
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • NMC-compliant RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs