Research news

Drink helps track brain cancer

A chemical drunk by patients before surgery can make brain cancer easier to diagnose and monitor, a study shows
Picture shows a surgeon operating on a patient. A chemical that assists brain cancer surgery by making tumour cells fluorescent could also help to safely diagnose the disease and monitor its response to treatment, a study suggests.

A chemical drunk by patients before surgery can make brain cancer easier to diagnose and monitor, a study shows

A chemical that assists brain cancer surgery by making tumour cells fluorescent could also help to safely diagnose the disease and monitor its response to treatment, a study suggests.

Brain cancer can be difficult to diagnose and monitor after treatment as tissue biopsies and radiation can injure the brain.

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital in the US looked at developing a less invasive alternative using a substance called 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), which patients drink before surgery.

All cells release particles called extracellular vesicles

Tumour cells in the brain take

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