Journal scan

Adverse prostate therapy effects show choice must be judicious

New study suggests research into selection and offer of prostate cancer treatments should be carefully discussed
Zoladex implant in prostate cancer

Most of the adverse effects of prostate cancer therapies are long-term and highly bothersome, suggesting that the choice, offer and selection of such treatments should be judiciously deliberated.

In this Finnish study, more than 1,000 men participated in a postal survey of their experience of prostate cancer treatment, with questions examining the occurrence, perceived level and professed nuisance and inconvenience of the effects of treatment.

A range of modalities were examined, such as prostatectomy, radiotherapies, hormonal mediation and careful surveillance. The degree of the effects, and well-being and satisfaction with the overall outcomes of treatment, were measured using a range of Likert-type scales.

The mean age of the men was 72, four fifths of the sample were married or cohabiting, and about three quarters had a coexisting chronic condition.

Subject to the treatment type, almost half of all patients reported

...

Most of the adverse effects of prostate cancer therapies are long-term and highly bothersome, suggesting that the choice, offer and selection of such treatments should be judiciously deliberated.


Picture: SPL

In this Finnish study, more than 1,000 men participated in a postal survey of their experience of prostate cancer treatment, with questions examining the occurrence, perceived level and professed nuisance and inconvenience of the effects of treatment.

A range of modalities were examined, such as prostatectomy, radiotherapies, hormonal mediation and careful surveillance. The degree of the effects, and well-being and satisfaction with the overall outcomes of treatment, were measured using a range of Likert-type scales.

The mean age of the men was 72, four fifths of the sample were married or cohabiting, and about three quarters had a coexisting chronic condition.

Subject to the treatment type, almost half of all patients reported undesirable effects enduring after five years. This was more common after prostatectomy and less so after brachytherapy. Psychological symptoms were common. Three quarters of participants described at least one symptom, with ‘worrying’ the most prevalent, followed by irritability, nervousness and difficulty concentrating.

Sex life was adversely affected in almost all respondents, with hormonal therapy most likely to affect potency and desire. Urinary symptoms were common, with almost half saying they had experienced objectionable odour.


Lehto U-S, Heli Tenhola, Kimmo Olavi Taari et al (2017) Patients’ perceptions of the negative effects following different prostate cancer treatments and the impact on psychological well-being: a nationwide survey. British Journal of Cancer. doi: 116(7):864-873.

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to cancernursingpractice.com
  • Bi-monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs