Jane Bates

Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Flexible working just a dream until NHS is adequately staffed 

While the concept of flexible, family-friendly working is very welcome, it is just a pipe dream until the significant shortage of NHS nurses is addressed, says Jane Bates.

Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Frail and elderly or fit for work?

The baby boomer generation is expected to work until approaching age 70 but they are considered frail and elderly when something goes wrong. You can’t have it both ways, says Jane Bates.

Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Constipation is nothing to be embarrassed about

Dispatched to the pharmacy for medication to ease a friend’s bowel problems, Jane Bates wonders why buying personal items causes such discomfort, even for nurses.

24 Hour NHS
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Does the public really want a 24-hour NHS? 

With 8am surgery seen as too early a start, and evening appointments deemed too late, round-the-clock care for non-emergencies may not be that popular.

Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: When illness cuts into people’s hectic agendas, life must still go on

Constantly rearranging a medical appointment due to work and family commitments is causing embarrassment for Jane Bates.

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Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: When the humble safety pin held nursing together

The once ubiquitous safety pin is now never seen on ward, a victim of Health and Safety. Yet they harmed no one and helped many, says Jane Bates.

attrition
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Nursing attrition and the erosion of team spirit

With little time for clinical supervision, team meetings or teaching opportunities, problems start to fester and the sense that people don’t matter becomes the norm, says Jane Bates.

banter
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Risk being annoying – a bit of banter lifts the mood

Even if your comedy routine isn’t always appreciated, humour is still a great way of helping patients to relax, says Jane Bates.

family
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Agonising over putting patients before family

Maintaining a work-life balance in the face of serious staff shortages is proving tricky for Jane Bates.

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Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Reflections on how to have your cake and eat it too

As Nursing Standard celebrates its 30th Birthday, Jane Bates reflects on her years as a columnist and why – if given the choice between doing two things you love – you should do both.

Jane Bates as student
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: The fear and fun of nurse training in the 1970s

From ‘public liability’ to running a ward in three years, Jane Bates has fond memories of her nerve-wracking yet rewarding student days

phone
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Why don’t people use the phone any more?

Finding time to send an email while coping with a ward full of demanding patients is a step too far for Jane Bates.

feedback
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Please don’t make me ask ‘How did I do?’

The awkward process of gaining feedback for revalidation is proving something of a headache for Jane Bates.

golden
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: false glitter of golden hellos

Golden hellos may look attractive on the surface but a good old-fashioned pay rise is a much better way to recruit and retain nurses, says Jane Bates.

hospital
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: No wonder we all hate hospitals

Coming back to the place where a loved one passed away can be hard for patients, and it is not always easy for staff either, says Jane Bates.

eyepad
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: I wonder what my patient means

A conversation followiing a cataract operation leaves Jane Bates somewhat perplexed.

speak
Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: Speak out if you see patients being treated insensitively

Accuse me of interfering if you must, but I won’t stand by and watch patients be treated unkindly, says Jane Bates.

Nursing Standard

Jane Bates: There’s nothing like a bit of research to give those flagging spirits a boost

As new research shows women born in July are more at risk of incontinence, it's all doom, gloom and plastic pants for us summer babies, says Jane Bates.

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