Catherine Oakley

Anti cancer Living

Book review: Anti Cancer Living

Chemotherapy nurse consultant Catherine Oakley reviews Anti Cancer Living

Can community pharmacy practitioners support patients who take oral anticancer medication?

Can community pharmacy practitioners support patients who take oral anticancer...

As more oral anticancer agents are available community pharmacy practitioners (CPPs) may need to play a greater role in supporting people with cancer. This article describes a service evaluation that aimed to identify the supportive care needs of patients who take oral anticancer medication (OAM). The objectives were to identify whether patients visit their community pharmacy in relation to their cancer or OAM and to explore their perceptions and experiences of support from CPPs. Findings from a survey, focus group and interviews show patients have mixed experiences of and opinions about CPPs. The article suggests that community pharmacy is an underused resource for people with cancer, probably because of low awareness by patients and lack of training for CPPs in supporting patients taking OAMs. Patient education and further training of pharmacists in this area would be beneficial to both parties and could reduce some of the pressures on health services.

Problem Solving in Patient-Centred and Integrated Cancer Care cover

Book review: Problem Solving in Patient-Centred and Integrated Cancer Care

Chemotherapy nurse consultant Catherine Oakley reviews this guide on how to embed cancer care into everyday practice

Chemotherapy nurses are being challenged to empower patients. Picture: Alamy

‘My challenge is for chemotherapy nurses to take a step back and rethink their role’

Catherine Oakley presents the National Chemotherapy Board Good Practice Guideline for promoting early identification of systemic anti-cancer therapies side effects

Development of a patient-held diary for oral chemotherapy

A generic oral chemotherapy diary has been developed in the South West London Cancer Network in response to growing national and local concerns about the safe management of patients prescribed oral chemotherapy drugs. The diary has recently been evaluated and early evidence suggests it is a useful tool. However, the diary is not considered the sole solution to minimising risk; rather, part of a comprehensive care package including patient education and support.