Penny Tremayne

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Managing complications associated with the use of indwelling urinary catheters

Managing complications associated with the use of indwelling urinary catheters

Learn the common complications, and how to reduce their incidence or manage them

Menopause

How nurse leaders can support staff going through the menopause

The value of a workplace culture that supports women experiencing menopausal symptoms

Management of indwelling urinary catheters for people with learning disabilities

Management of indwelling urinary catheters for people with learning disabilities

Care should be person-centred, holistic and underpinned by current evidence-based practice

Free
Implementing laughter therapy to enhance the well-being of patients and nurses

Implementing laughter therapy to enhance the well-being of patients and nurses

Discover the physical and psychosocial benefits of laughter therapy for patients and nurses

who says i can't

Book review: Who Says I Can’t? A Guide to Living Well With COPD

This book provides an inspiring insight into what it means to live with a chronic condition.

Gastrointestinal care

Gastrointestinal care for older people

This article discusses gastrointestinal (GI) healthcare in older people. It outlines the physiological changes that occur in the GI tract as a result of ageing, and discusses common GI disorders in older people. These GI disorders include dysphagia, gastrointestinal reflux disease, colorectal cancer, diverticular disease, constipation and anaemia. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the factors that may influence gastrointestinal health in older people, including nutrition, hydration and alcohol use, which are important considerations when delivering person-centred care.

Oxygen therapy

Who Says I Can’t? A Guide to Living Well With COPD

Book review by Penny Tremayne, senior lecturer at De Montfort University, Leicester

Using humour to enhance the nurse-patient relationship

The appropriate use of humour is a valuable asset in nursing practice. Used daily in interactions with patients, humour can help to develop the therapeutic relationship and build resilience. This article discusses how humour can promote physiological and psychological wellbeing, while reducing stress and anxiety. Recommendations for including humour in patient care are outlined.

Service user involvement in nurse education

Service user involvement is now recognised as an integral component of nurse education. This article describes the involvement of one service user, who experienced a traumatic limb amputation, in an educational session for second-year nursing students at De Montfort University. The aim of the initiative was to use the patient’s experience to improve care delivery.