Heather Henry

Focus on asthma 2: air pollution and its effects on children and young people

Focus on asthma 2: air pollution and its effects on children and young people

Why you should read this article: • To identify the adverse effects of indoor and outdoor air pollution on children, particularly those with asthma • To increase your knowledge of how to support children, families and schools to limit their exposure to air pollution and reduce their own emissions of pollutants • To count towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD, or you may wish to write a reflective account (UK readers) • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers) This article is the second in a series on asthma. The first article identified that the UK is experiencing an ‘epidemic’ of childhood asthma and one of the major culprits is air pollution. This article examines the main causes of air pollution and how they affect the lung health of children from before birth and onwards. It considers the contribution of indoor and outdoor air pollution, how these have changed over time and the unequal effect they may have on vulnerable populations. The nurse’s role is discussed, not only in terms of clinical care, but also as adviser to families and schools on what actions to take to limit their exposure and reduce their own emissions of pollutants.

How nurses can promote well-being in personalised care

How nurses can promote well-being in personalised care

Harnessing the strengths, skills and resources of people and communities to improve health

Focus on asthma 1: the state of care for children and young people in the UK and globally

Focus on asthma 1: the state of care for children and young people in the UK and...

Why you should read this article • To enhance your knowledge of global and UK trends in asthma and asthma care as it relates to children and young people • To recognise the importance of social determinants of health such as smoking, air pollution and inadequate housing in the development of asthma • To count towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD, or you may wish to write a reflective account (UK readers) • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers) This is the first in a series of articles on asthma, the most prevalent long-term condition in children with a significant burden of disease. This first article presents an overview of the state of asthma and asthma care in the UK and globally, especially as it relates to children and young people. It considers prevalence, age and sex comparisons, causation, morbidity and mortality rates, cost and the quality of care. It also outlines what children and young people wish for their asthma care.

Inhaler

Using play to educate children about asthma

Improving asthma knowledge among children and their families

Why we should be asking communities for help rather than giving it

People at the sharp end of inequality can view nurses as a threat, says Heather Henry

leg club members' ulcers are dressed

Why the Long Term Plan is a missed opportunity in health promotion

A Queen’s Nurse says medical models alone will not address social determinants of health

Brightening the future of children with asthma through a social initiative

Evidence suggests that a social approach can raise people’s levels of control in managing long term conditions, so independent public health nurse Heather Henry took it on board to create BreathChamps – helping communities affected by asthma

Heather Henry: Time for straight talk about nursing’s hierarchies

Workforce strategies must adopt new approaches and consider how nurses can become enablers of solutions rather than simply deliverers of services, says Heather Henry

Opinion piece

‘I need your help’

The four words community nurses should use to address health inequalities – and ensure they see their patients as partners.

social

Heather Henry: Use social media to work in partnership with patients

Nurses are cautious users of social media, aware of the risk of crossing boundaries or breaching patient confidentiality. Genuine engagement is scary, but it could enable people to find their own health solutions, says the chair of the New NHS Alliance.

heather henry wellness

Heather Henry: From treating need to creating wellness

Looking at what is strong rather than what is wrong can help individuals and communities find their own solutions to problems, says the chair of the New NHS Alliance.

equalities

The prime minister’s focus on public services is no cure for our unequal society

A preoccupation with service delivery can foster dependency. Nurses must speak up about the reasons for inequality and work with local people to create the conditions for wellness.

How we empowered dads to boost their children’s wellbeing

Heather Henry helps fathers in a deprived area learn coping strategies from each other.

Turning a blind eye to the needs of young people

Heather Henry bridges the gaps between a broken community

The three Cs of health inequality

Tips to encourage patients to take an active role in their wellbeing

Time to market nursing

Time to market nursing

Cultural shift

Many are hailing it as the most significant development since the 1960s. NHS England’s...

Caught in Catch-22

Anyone who has tried to make an appointment with their GP recently will know the...

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