Take a walk on the wild side

A course on how to cater for the health needs of extreme travellers can help nurses add another string to their bow

A course on how to cater for the health needs of extreme travellers can help nurses add another string to their bow.

Abstract

For nurses who dream of hacking through rainforests or camping in the desert, a new course could help turn it into a working reality.

A diploma in expedition and wilderness medicine, run by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow and pending accreditation by Glasgow Caledonian University, gives nurses and doctors the clinical knowledge to work in remote environments as well as practical skills such as map reading, lighting fires and pitching tents.

Nurse James Moore set up the course with medical colleague Jon Dallimore to meet the growing demand for medics to attend expeditions or offer advice to patients planning trips. They decided to design the course, due to start in June, after editing the latest edition of the Oxford Handbook of Expedition and Wilderness Medicine.

Mr Moore has more than a decade of experience providing healthcare support to film crews, school trips, charity treks and expeditionary organisations such as Raleigh International. His longest trip has been a three-month stint in the Borneo jungle, but many expeditions are shorter, and can be fitted into nurses’ holidays.

Read the article

This article was first published in print in Nursing Standard: volume 30, issue 28

This article is for subscribers only