Reflective accounts

Self-managed diabetes

A CPD article enhanced Luchembe Chitwamali’s knowledge of assisting individuals with diabetes to self-manage

A CPD article enhanced Luchembe Chitwamalis knowledge of assisting individuals with diabetes to self-manage.

Abstract

Diabetes is a common long-term condition resulting from a deficiency of insulin secretion or resistance to insulin. It can affect all aspects of an individuals life, and it is a significant public health issue.

Healthcare professionals require appropriate knowledge and skills to help individuals to manage their condition. If diabetes is not well managed, it can lead to complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and alterations in the circadian rhythm.

Management of diabetes should take into consideration the persons circumstances and lifestyle. It can be challenging, and may involve monitoring blood glucose levels and carbohydrate intake, adjusting insulin doses and activities, and awareness of the signs and symptoms of hypoglycaemia. Increased stress at work, the presence of a cold or infection, and generally feeling unwell can affect blood glucose control.

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A CPD article enhanced Luchembe Chitwamali’s knowledge of assisting individuals with diabetes to self-manage.

Abstract

Diabetes is a common long-term condition resulting from a deficiency of insulin secretion or resistance to insulin. It can affect all aspects of an individual’s life, and it is a significant public health issue.

Healthcare professionals require appropriate knowledge and skills to help individuals to manage their condition. If diabetes is not well managed, it can lead to complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and alterations in the circadian rhythm.

Management of diabetes should take into consideration the person’s circumstances and lifestyle. It can be challenging, and may involve monitoring blood glucose levels and carbohydrate intake, adjusting insulin doses and activities, and awareness of the signs and symptoms of hypoglycaemia. Increased stress at work, the presence of a cold or infection, and generally feeling unwell can affect blood glucose control.

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This reflective account is based on NS825 Phillips A (2016) Improving self-management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Nursing Standard. 30, 19, 52-58.

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