Patient view

'My well-being is due to the care, dedication and support of this IBD team'

Barbara Scally describes the 'exemplary' care she received from inflammatory bowel disease nurse specialists Alan Boal and Seth Squires.
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Barbara Scally describes the 'exemplary' care she received from inflammatory bowel disease nurse specialists Alan Boal and Seth Squires

In 2008 I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. My disease was stable until 2013, when I had a severe episode while on holiday in France, requiring a 12-day hospital stay on my return.

Within 15 minutes of my arrival at the acute medical receiving ward at the Royal Alexandria Hospital in Paisley, I saw inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) nurse specialists Alan Boal and Seth Squires. On admission, I was immediately given IV fluids and steroids and seen by a surgeon in preparation for the removal of my colon. I was given rescue therapy of infliximab, which is not yet licensed, and which ultimately saved my

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Barbara Scally describes the 'exemplary' care she received from inflammatory bowel disease nurse specialists Alan Boal and Seth Squires

In 2008 I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. My disease was stable until 2013, when I had a severe episode while on holiday in France, requiring a 12-day hospital stay on my return.


The quick thinking of IBD nurse specialists Alan Boal and Seth Squires helped
prevent the removal of Ms Scally's colon.

Within 15 minutes of my arrival at the acute medical receiving ward at the Royal Alexandria Hospital in Paisley, I saw inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) nurse specialists Alan Boal and Seth Squires. On admission, I was immediately given IV fluids and steroids and seen by a surgeon in preparation for the removal of my colon. I was given rescue therapy of infliximab, which is not yet licensed, and which ultimately saved my colon from being removed. The care I received was exemplary, and as such I was able to return to work and enjoy everyday life.

I had a relapse in July 2014. During this time I was able to make contact with Alan and Seth directly. The nurses monitored my bloods and adjusted my drugs accordingly, trying to reverse the charge of the disease.

Unfortunately, the drugs proved ineffective. Alan arranged a bed for me and I was immediately administered IV steroids. These didn't work either, and my consultant was now on annual leave and would not be able to apply for infliximab.

Forward-thinking

However, this wasn't a problem, because the application had been prepared prior to the event, in case the steroids proved ineffective. This forward-thinking and planning meant there was no delay in treatment and once again my colon was saved.

For a year I received regular infliximab infusions to keep my disease under control. The nurses organised for me to have a trough test, which showed I had developed a tolerance of infliximab, meaning it was no longer helping me. The test spared me from taking potent drugs that were no longer effective, and I currently remain well on oral medication.

My ongoing well-being is due to the care, professionalism, dedication and support of this IBD team. They always exhibit best practice and are an example of the NHS at its finest.

During the emergency stages of my disease, I have no doubt that their immediate response and subsequent action not only saved my colon, but saved my life. Now, they continue to protect my ongoing quality of life, which is equally as important. I am so grateful to these wonderful and dedicated nurses.

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