Redundancy - When one door closes

Redundancy can be dispiriting but take the opportunity to draw a breath, learn from mistakes and work out what you want from a new position

Redundancy can be dispiriting but take the opportunity to draw a breath, learn from mistakes and work out what you want from a new position.

Abstract

We probably all know someone who has been made redundant from their job. It could even have happened to you.

If so, you will know first-hand how upsetting and dispiriting it can be. Someone telling you that the experience will only make you stronger probably won’t help, but it is more than likely the truth.

‘The hardest thing to remember in these sorts of situations is to focus on the bigger picture,’ says Simon Hudson, a director at recruiters Hays Healthcare.

‘Losing your job leaves you with a clean slate to start again, and can present you with opportunities that you may not have otherwise had or considered.’

So what next? Although you will probably want to start searching for a new job immediately, you should take some time to evaluate which elements of your job you did or did not enjoy, suggests Nick Simpson, chief executive of specialist healthcare recruiter MSI Group.

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This article was first published in print under the original title 'When one door closes' in Nursing Standard: volume 30, issue 35

 

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