Revalidation articles

Trust trials new model of testing competency

From next year, nurses will need to prove they are competent to remain registered every three years. Alison Moore spoke to professionals involved in piloting the plan in Northern Ireland.

From next year, nurses will need to prove they are competent to remain registered every three years. Alison Moore spoke to professionals involved in piloting the plan in Northern Ireland.

Abstract

In April 2016, the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s new revalidation model will come into force. The Western Health and Social Care Trust in Northern Ireland was one of 19 organisations across the UK that undertook a pilot to test the new model.

Some nurses in Northern Ireland are among those who have already helped test out the model and their experience could offer guidance to other nurses and employers about to embark on this huge task.

A total of 122 volunteers from all sections of the Western Health and Social Care Trust took part in the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) pilot earlier this year. The trust was one of 19 pilot sites in the UK.

Trusts in Northern Ireland are integrated, providing health and social care, and covering both acute hospitals and community settings, so they may employ a broader range of nurses than English trusts.

Under revalidation, nurses will need to complete 450 hours of nursing practise every year, plus 40 hours of continuing professional development (CPD) every three years.

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This article was first published in print in Nursing Standard: volume 29, issue 52

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