Editorial

30 years: Primary Health Care journal celebrates the work of community, public health and general practice nurses

Despite concerns around health inequalities, primary healthcare practitioners continually show just how creative, adaptable and highly-skilled they are
PHC 30th anniversary

Despite concerns around health inequalities, primary healthcare practitioners continually show just how creative, adaptable and highly-skilled they are

As we mark 30 years of Primary Health Care and reflect on how this nursing journal that has strived to be the voice of nurses working across community, general practice and public health settings it is tempting to ask, Whats changed?

A flick through the covers, articles and comments from all the way back to 1990 as we enter the third decade of the 21st century highlights some lasting sores, top of which must surely be the failure to sort out social care and the effect that has on patients and clients across the age span.

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Despite concerns around health inequalities, primary healthcare practitioners continually show just how creative, adaptable and highly-skilled they are

As we mark 30 years of Primary Health Care and reflect on how this nursing journal that has strived to be the voice of nurses working across community, general practice and public health settings – it is tempting to ask, ‘What’s changed?’

A flick through the covers, articles and comments from all the way back to 1990 as we enter the third decade of the 21st century highlights some lasting sores, top of which must surely be the failure to sort out social care and the effect that has on patients and clients across the age span.

Concerns about falling numbers of district nurses, health visitors and school nurses feature in some way in most issues today, and the unsatisfactory terms and conditions many general practice nurses endure dominate discussions. We can see that community health services, and indeed nursing provision, is still in turmoil as it has been across the decades.

Celebrate independent-minded, forward-thinking nursing workforce

Despite these, and many other areas of concern around health inequalities and growing ill health-related to poor living conditions, nurses working across these settings continue to illustrate just how innovative, creative, adaptable and highly-skilled you are.

‘Judging the RCNi general practice and community #RCNInurseawards gives me a snapshot of some of your work: your perseverance, leadership and sheer determination to improve healthcare is humbling’

It might be hard to look up from the day-to-day business of aiming to deliver the best evidence-based nursing care, but there is so much to celebrate for the independent-minded, forward-thinking nursing workforce this journal serves.

As the editor who has steered Primary Health Care through the ups and downs faced by your workforce, I can honestly say that I never stop being impressed by the way new ways of working and treatment changes are embraced, problems worked around and patient’s needs addressed.

Judging the RCNi general practice and community #RCNInurseawards gives me a snapshot of some of your work: your perseverance, leadership and sheer determination to improve healthcare is humbling.

As 2020 is the year of the nurse and midwife, let’s ensure the contribution of nurses from across primary healthcare is celebrated and your voices are given a greater prominence.

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