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How nurses can support people with ME

Often referred to as the ‘invisible illness’, ME can be a highly debilitating condition
ME

Often referred to as the ‘invisible illness’, ME can be a highly debilitating condition

Before I became ill with myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), I was a nursing student. I completed almost two years of a four-year master’s degree in nursing science, and I loved it.

Until I was diagnosed with ME I had never heard of the condition. It was never mentioned or taught on my course, despite me undertaking modules in paediatric nursing – ME is the most common cause of health-related long-term school absence – and neurology.

ME, sometimes diagnosed as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), is a fluctuating, chronic, neurological condition with symptoms affecting many body systems.

The condition affects about 250,000 adults and children in the UK, yet there are still gaps in knowledge about how severe and debilitating it can be, and how varied its symptoms are.

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