News

Most nurses on COVID-19 temporary register not tempted to stay

More than a third of those surveyed were likely to rejoin permanently, says NMC
Older people returned to the register

More than a third of those surveyed were likely to rejoin permanently, says NMC

This article was updated on 14 September 2020

Most nursing professionals who joined the Nursing and Midwifery Councils (NMC) COVID-19 temporary register are not planning to return permanently, an analysis reveals.

The register was introduced on 27 March to boost workforce numbers in response to demands placed on the NHS by the pandemic.

NMC surveys people who joined the temporary register about their plans

The NMC initially invited nurses and midwives who had left the register within the previous three years to join. This was expanded to those who had left within three to five years and overseas-trained nurses and midwives.

  • RELATED

More than a third of those surveyed were likely to rejoin permanently, says NMC

This article was updated on 14 September 2020


Nurses who had left the register were asked to re-join during the COVID-19 peak Picture: iStock

Most nursing professionals who joined the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s (NMC) COVID-19 temporary register are not planning to return permanently, an analysis reveals.

The register was introduced on 27 March to boost workforce numbers in response to demands placed on the NHS by the pandemic.

NMC surveys people who joined the temporary register about their plans

The NMC initially invited nurses and midwives who had left the register within the previous three years to join. This was expanded to those who had left within three to five years and overseas-trained nurses and midwives.

As part of its analysis, the NMC asked 9,433 respondents how likely they were to join the permanent register.

Of the 6,100 who had left within the past three years, only 19.7% said they were highly likely to re-join.

Among the 1,455 who had left up to five years before, 27.3% were highly likely to return, while 97.3% of the 1,878 overseas applicants intend to join the permanent register.

If all those who said they were highly likely to re-join did, this would mean 3,425 more people on the register. This equates to 36.3% of temporary registrants who responded to the question on how likely they were to join the permanent register.*

An early pay rise would incentivise nurses to stay in the profession, says RCN director


Susan Masters: 'Nurses who want to leave
leave outnumber those who want to return' 

RCN director of nursing, policy and public affairs, Susan Masters, said while all those who joined the temporary register should be proud of their accomplishments, the fact they were needed at all was a problem.

‘Even if everyone who temporarily registered, including nurses who had recently retired, became permanent registrants, this number would be dwarfed by the many considering departing our profession.’

Ms Masters argued that the best way to convince both current and temporary registrants to keep working in nursing was for the government to provide an early pay rise.

NMC chief warns that extra nurses may be needed again in the coming months

NMC chief executive Andrea Sutcliffe thanked all those who had signed up to the temporary register when needed, adding that they may still be needed in the months ahead.

‘We will keep working with our partners in health and social care across all four countries of the UK so that those on our temporary register can continue to contribute if they want to,’ she said.


*This article was updated on 14 September 2020 to include these figures.


Related material

COVID-19 temporary register analysis, 2 July 2020


In other news

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to primary healthcare.com
  • Bi-monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs