News

Film raises awareness of cervical screening among BME women

Cervical screening film translated into different languages for BME communities
bme

Nurses and other healthcare professionals can now use a short film translated into different languages to inform women from black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds about cervical screening.

Research has shown that awareness of cervical cancer and prevention is lower among women from ethnic minority backgrounds compared with white women.

The film, called Your Guide to Cervical Screening (smear test), was created by the charity Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust and has been translated into Arabic, Bengali (standard), Bengali (Sylheti), Chinese (Mandarin), Hindi, Polish, Tamil and Urdu.

Improve knowledge

It is designed to be watched by women on their own or to be used by nurses and healthcare professionals to show to groups of women to improve knowledge and decision making.

The film features women from different ethnic backgrounds and it uses animations to

Nurses and other healthcare professionals can now use a short film translated into different languages to inform women from black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds about cervical screening.


The short film comes in several languages

Research has shown that awareness of cervical cancer and prevention is lower among women from ethnic minority backgrounds compared with white women. 

The film, called Your Guide to Cervical Screening (smear test), was created by the charity Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust and has been translated into Arabic, Bengali (standard), Bengali (Sylheti), Chinese (Mandarin), Hindi, Polish, Tamil and Urdu.

Improve knowledge

It is designed to be watched by women on their own or to be used by nurses and healthcare professionals to show to groups of women to improve knowledge and decision making. 

The film features women from different ethnic backgrounds and it uses animations to explain the screening process with translated voiceovers.

Cervical screening

A 2011 study by the charity showed 12% of women from BME backgrounds of screening age had never attended a cervical screening appointment, compared with 8% of white women. 

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust chief executive Robert Music said: ‘We hope this free film is used by healthcare professionals and community groups to reassure those who might be putting it off or to educate those who don’t understand the purpose of the test.’

Saving lives

The new film comes as public health minister Jane Ellison announced changes to the cervical screening programme in England that could save up to 600 lives a year.

Samples will now be tested for human papilloma virus (HPV), which can increase the risk of developing cervical cancer. 

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are currently considering whether to follow suit with their cervical screening programmes.

Click here for a guide to cervical screening

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