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Dementia app for BME patients offers culturally tailored support

BME families can experience difficulties accessing dementia support, says Admiral Nurse
Dementia App

BME families can experience difficulties accessing dementia support, says Admiral Nurse

A new dementia app could prove a vital tool in supporting patients and families from black and minority ethnic (BME) communities, according to a lead nurse in the field.

The app, called the Culturally Sensitive Reminiscence Tool, helps healthcare professionals and families support BME patients living with dementia.

Admiral Nurse Dementia Helpline deputy clinical lead Paulette Winchester-Joseph said stigma and a lack of resources mean BME families can experience difficulties accessing dementia support.

This app could be vital for families trying to bridge the gap between getting a diagnosis and support post-diagnosis, she said. It can also be part of the care and support nurses offer.

Specific

BME families can experience difficulties accessing dementia support, says Admiral Nurse


Phicture: iStock

A new dementia app could prove a vital tool in supporting patients and families from black and minority ethnic (BME) communities, according to a lead nurse in the field.

The app, called the Culturally Sensitive Reminiscence Tool, helps healthcare professionals and families support BME patients living with dementia.

Admiral Nurse Dementia Helpline deputy clinical lead Paulette Winchester-Joseph said stigma and a lack of resources mean BME families can experience difficulties accessing dementia support.

‘This app could be vital for families trying to bridge the gap between getting a diagnosis and support post-diagnosis,’ she said. ‘It can also be part of the care and support nurses offer.’

Specific reminiscence resources

The app contains resources specifically tailored to African and Caribbean communities, including music, videos, photos, word searches and bingo. Family members can also record their own memories on the app to help healthcare workers understand a patient’s background.

The app was designed by brothers Karl and Junior Wilson when they realised their mother, who lived with dementia until she died in 2016, did not have culturally sensitive resources in her care home.

Junior Wilson said: ‘There is currently a lack of relevant culturally sensitive support for people living with dementia and also those living in isolation, which can lead to depression. 

'Our app is a solution to at least some of the causes of these problems.’

Unique experiences

Ms Winchester-Joseph welcomed the use of the app, but warned against a one-size-fits-all approach.

‘It’s important to remember that the experience of dementia is unique to everyone, so this particular piece of technology may not be suitable for all families,’ she said. ‘Specialist dementia Admiral Nurses can help families see what is most appropriate for their individual circumstances.’

Developments are underway to include the South Asian and Irish communities in the app.

The app is free for family members to use and has a monthly fee for care homes.


Find out more

Culturally Sensitive Reminiscence Tool 


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